Close-up in Ottawa, Illinois

Lincoln Douglas Debate

 Lincoln – Douglas Debate Statue in Washington Square Park Ottawa, Illinois

1957 — 1965

Did you ever visit a place and feel that you belong there?  I had that feeling when I was a young.  We would visit a great-grandaunt who lived in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois with some friends.  The friends had a daughter my age and we became friends.  I would stay with them for a couple of weeks each summer from about the time I was 10 until I graduated high school.  My friend and I would walk all over Ottawa, and I came to know Ottawa as well as my own town.  We went to the parks, the movies, played on the school play-ground, etc. I loved Ottawa and I felt I belonged there.  I wished my family could live in Ottawa.  I had a vague knowledge that we had some ancestors or relatives that had lived in Ottawa at one time, and I knew my grandmother was born there.  Beyond that I didn’t know who they were or even their names and I really didn’t care at that time. 

Fast Forward to 1990 -2018

Now many years later, I am into genealogy and want to know all about my ancestors especially the ones that were from Ottawa.  So my search began and I spent many years researching my two sets of 2nd great-grandparents that settled in Ottawa. My 2nd great grandfather, Charles Bowers, settled in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois in the 1850’s and stayed in Ottawa until his death in 1897. After his death, his wife and children stayed in Ottawa except for Robert who moved to Chicago.  The other set of 2nd great-grandparents, Conrad and Anna Reinhardt, came to Ottawa in the early 1880’s. They lived there until their deaths. Anna died in 1910 and Conrad in 1920.  All their children moved away from Ottawa. Today there is no family or friends living in Ottawa.

I still love visiting Ottawa and seeing all the places that I visited as a kid.  In addition to researching in the courthouse, genealogical society, historical museum, and the cemetery, I visited all the places I went when I was there in the 50’s and 60’s.  Some things have changed but there are still some things there that remain the same, and I enjoy reminiscing.  I have seen the house where the Bower’s and the Reinhardt’s lived.  One of the things that I learned is that one of great-grandaunt Elizabeth Bowers was a school teacher at Lincoln School.  That is the school play-ground we played on as kids.  One summer day a few years ago I parked my car in front of the school and walked around it. While walking, I thought about how I was walking on the same ground as my ancestor’s walk on.  I still feel connected to that town.  A town I never lived in.  I think somehow I instinctively knew this is where I came from and I belonged here. Between visiting Ottawa and researching both families, I feel I have come to know both the town and the families close-up.

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

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Cemetery at Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England

Cathedral of the Fens.

Photo by Martin

Several years ago I found a picture of the church and cemetery  in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England where my 2nd great-grandfather, Charles Bowers, was baptized.  I showed the picture to my one son who is a photographer.  Several months later he while online, he saw a picture of a church that looked like the St. Clements Church posted on a site for photographers.  He contacted the photographer and asked him if it was the same church.   The photographer answered that it was not, but that he planned on going to the St. Clements Church in a couple of weeks, and asked if my son would like him to take a picture for him.  My son said yes and asked if he would look for graves with the Bowers name on them.  The photographer agreed and sent him pictures of the church and some grave stones.   I like to say thank-you to the photograper, Martin.  Without you we would not have these wonderful pictures.  Thank-you once again!

Here is what he wrote:  “I found six graves in a group, three of which still had names on them.  The other three had unfortunately succumbed to erosion and were illegible, but because of the grouping, I’m sure they were all related.  The legible stones had the names of Eliza Bowers, Mary Bowers (wife of William Bowers) and Thomas (Son of William and Mary Bowers). I’m sure these names will be of interest to you and your family.  Mary died on October 11, 1881 age 80 years and Thomas did June 21, 1882 age 60 years.”

Eliza is my 3rd great- grandmother born Eliza Haggerson about 1791 in England.[1]  Eliza was a widow when she married Bonnet Bowers in 1822.[2]  She had a son William Linford from her previous marriage.[3]  Bonnet and Eliza had four children Richard,[4] Robert,[5] Eliza,[6] and Charles.[7]  Daughter, Eliza, was only 3 days old when she died.[8]  She is also buried at Terrington-St. Clements. Eliza was only 41 years old when she died on 22 January 1832[9] (Tombstone pictured above).  Charles(my 2nd great-grandfather) was just 3 years and four months when his mother died. 

The grave of Mary Bowers (wife of William) is Mary Walker[10] and William Bowers is the brother of Bonnet Bowers.[11]  I have found the marriage record for William and Mary and one of the witnesses is Bonnet Bowers.[12]  On Bonnet and Eliza’s marriage record the witnesses are William and Mary Bowers.[13]  Also found birth of a William Bowers born to the same parents as Bonnet. [14] Also buried at Terrington-St. Clement are Bonnet’s parents Charles[15] and Sarah[16], brothers Robert[17] and Thomas,[18] and sister Sarah. [19]  Most likely Bonnet’s brother William is buried there since his wife and son are buried there.  Don’t you just love the way these people used the same names over and over?  It’s hard to keep all the Charles’, William’s, Robert’s, Thomas’, and Eliza’s straight.  And the use of these names didn’t stop here it went down through the generations. I would like to take a trip to England someday to see the tombstones for myself, and to see where they lived and walk on the same ground that they did.  

52 ancestors in 52 weeks Weeks topic this week is Cemetery

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst



[1] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2]  Marriage Record for Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford married 27 April 1822; Register of Marriages in the Parish of Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; 1813-1838 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3] Baptism for William Linford, 28 August 1811; Terrington-St. Clement, Norfolk England: Parish Register Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812 Item 2; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs., filmed 26 July 1988, Film Number 13640109, film unit # 2161 NCD 2 Roll # 5.

[4] Baptism Record for Richard Bowers baptized 20 April 1822; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[5] Baptism Record for Robert Bowers baptized 25 February 1825; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[6] Baptism Record for Eliza Bowers baptized 10 June 1827; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[7] Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[8] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (daughter of Bonnet & Eliza Bowers) buried on 21 June 1827. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England

[9] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England

[10] Marriage Record for William Bowers and Mary Walker married on 19 April 1819.  Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register of Marriages 1813 – 1838; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England

[11]  Baptism record for William Bowers Baptized 03 August 1788; Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[12] Marriage Record for William Bowers and Mary Walker married on 19 April 1819.  Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register of Marriages 1813 – 1838; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England

[13] Marriage Record for Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford married 27 April 1822; Register of Marriages in the Parish of Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; 1813-1838 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[14]  Baptism record for William Bowers Baptized 03 August 1788; Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[15] Burial Record for Charles Bowers (born abt 1757)buried 16 January 1838; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Terrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambrigeshire, England.

[16] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 1757) buried 8 February 1826; ; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[17] Burial record for Robert Bowers died on 04 July 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[18] Burial record for Robert Bowers died on 04 July 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[19] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 1757) buried 8 February 1826; ; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

 

Cousin Killed in Storm

A third cousin of mine, Terry Niko, was killed in a storm that hit Des Plaines, Illinois in July 1972.  The newspaper report says the storm had tornado like winds, and heavy rain.  There were funnel-like clouds that streak across the sky in a south easterly direction.  Roofs were blown off, a building was leveled to the ground, extensive damages and broken windows to buildings.  Many trees were down throughout the area.  Homes were damaged due to the high winds, flying debris, and tree branches.  It looks like Terry was the only one to lose his life in this terrible storm.

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It’s a little hard to read so I will transcribe the part about my third cousin Terry Niko.

“Police said Terry Niko 23 of 7500 Elmhurst Road, Bensenville died at Holy Family Hospital 40 minutes after he was crushed in his car by a falling tree limb in the 700 block of Graceland Ave.

According to reports Niko, alone in his car at the time was driving southbound on Graceland Ave when the large limb fell on the roof of his car about 100 feet south of Prairie Ave.  It reportedly took 8 policemen to lift the heavy limb off the car.[1]

Unfortunately, I did not know Terry, and I didn’t know of his existence until recently.  You may wonder how I found a cousin that I did not know existed.

One of the things I like to do is reverse genealogy.  You might ask, “What is reverse genealogy?” I start from the past and move to the present.  I start with what I know.  For example, I have already traced backward from myself to great-grandfather, Carl Desens, and to the 2nd great-grandfather, John Desens.  I know my 2nd great-grandfather, John Desens, had three children that lived, married, and had children.  Who were they and who are their children and grandchildren and so on?  By doing this I hope to find living second and third cousins.  I always hope to find someone who will share my interest in searching our common ancestor or may have been told family stories that I haven’t heard yet. 

Here is an example of reverse genealogy.  I start with John Desens family listed here.

johann desens

Carl is my great-grandfather, and I have searched all of his eight children.  Now I would like to search for Hanna’s children.  So I search various sources such as census, vital records, and newspapers.   After I did that, here is what I found about Hanna Desens family.

Hanna desens

 

I researched each of Hanna’s  children.  Here is the family of her third child Martha:

Martha R

Then I researched each of Martha’s children.  Here is the family of Martha’s third child Irene.

Martha Rosenwinkel

Now I researched each of Irene’s children.  When I got to last one, Terry Niko, I noticed that he was only 23 when he died, and I wondered why he died so young.  A search in the newspaper archive answered my question.  That is how I came to find Terry and his sad story.  May Terry rest in peace, and God Bless his family.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is Storms.   

 

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

[1] Arlington Heights, Illinois, Daily Herald Suburban Chicago, Monday, July 17, 1972, Section 1 Pg. 3.

Maiden Aunt

 

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Martha is first one on the left

 

The topic this week for  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks  is Maiden Aunt.  I could only find one maiden aunt, and I have already written about her.  So I decided to write about someone who is not a blood relative, but was someone who I thought of as an Aunt and loved.

My grandmother’s brother, Ralph Bowers, was married to Helen Treppa.  Helen had a sister Martha who lived with Ralph and Helen.  When Uncle Ralph and Aunt Helen came to holiday or Sunday dinners, Martha was usually with them.  Martha (Marty was her nickname) paid a lot of attention to me when I was a child, and I loved the attention.  I remember her as a very sweet and quiet lady.  At the time, I just enjoyed Martha’s company and attention, and never thought about her life.  So I really don’t know very much about it.  All I really know is from researching records, and there are not a lot of records on Martha.  No surprises surfaced like a secret marriage or illegitimate children.  She must have led a very normal quiet life, just like I thought. 

Martha was born to John and Helen Treppa on 4 May 1911 in Cook County, Illinois.[1] Martha was the youngest of five children.[2] The family lived at 1441 Lill Avenue in Chicago, Illinois.[3]  When I knew Martha she lived in that same house on Lill Avenue with her sister Helen and brother-in-law Ralph Bowers.  They lived on the second floor and someone else lived downstairs.  In 1940 her brother John and his family lived on the lower level[4] and sometime later they moved and then the apartment was rented out.

Martha worked as a packer for a wholesale meat company.[5]  She always seemed old-fashioned and she was the typical maiden aunt of the time.  Martha died 7 August 1992 at 81 years, 3 months and 3 days old in the state of Washington.[6]

I will always think of Martha with love and remember her kindness and quiet ways.

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst


[1] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[2] Year: 1920; Census Place: Chicago Ward 24, Cook (Chicago), Illinois; Roll: T625_335; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 1359

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).

[3] Ibid.

[4] Year: 1940; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Roll: m-t0627-01012; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 103-2902.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2014.  Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

 

The Old Homestead

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Grandma and Grandpa’s House

The old homestead to me is my grandparent’s house.   I lived in three different houses between 1 and 18 years old.  But my grandparents stayed in their house.  We never lived far from them and it was my second home.  Anytime I felt like it, I could walk or ride my bike to Grandma’s.  They didn’t have a big house, and they didn’t change things very often.  It was typical two bedroom one bath bungalow.  It was always there from the time I can remember until I was in my 40’s when it was sold because Grandma and Grandpa were gone.  Sometimes I wish it would have stayed in the family.  But I have wonderful memories of the house and their big yard.  Grandpa and Grandma both liked to garden.  They had flower beds all around the back yard and house.  Plus they had a large vegetable garden and grape barber.  There was an old chicken coop in back that Grandpa kept his garden tools in.  I always worried that something would come running out of it.  Next to the chicken coop was a compost pile.  We didn’t dare throw coffee grounds, potato peels, or egg shells in the garbage, they and other scraps went in the compost pile.  The Great Western railroad tracks that ran behind her house, and they only ran freight trains.  My brother loved trains, and he could hear one coming before anyone else.  He would run out there to watch it go by and wave to the engineer.  He would be standing there and nothing would come.  We thought he was mistaken, but sure enough shortly one would come.  Grandma made friends with all kinds of creatures such as; the squirrels, possums, raccoons, and even snakes, and fed them all.  They had some fruit trees and Grandma would make jelly from the fruit.  She made the best cherry, crabapple, and grape jelly.

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Part of Grandma and Grandpa’s back yard.  You can see the railroad tracks in back. 

 In front there were five or six stairs that led up to a screened front porch.  The porch had a swing, cot, and rocking chair.  Grandpa would sit on swing and Grandma in the rocking chair.  The rest of us either sat next to Grandpa on the swing or on the cot.  Many a hot summer nights were spent on the porch.  No cell phones, no computer, no TV, just conversation.  We never ran out of things to say and never tired of hearing Grandma and Grandpa’s stories.  I do wish I paid more attention back then, it would make searching for ancestors easier.  Although, I’m sure some of the stories were exaggerated.  

To the left on the porch was the door that led to the living room.  There were three windows together that faced the front of the house.  Grandpa’s chair was in the corner next to the windows.  They had a table in front of the windows filled with plants and some plants on the floor.   There was a sofa along one wall and chair on the opposite wall in the corner.  Next to that chair was some shelves and the TV set. 

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Grandma and Grandpa’s living room at Christmas time.

There was an Archway that led to the dining room.  Grandma had a big table and buffet.  In one corner was a secretary desk with rounded glass cabinet.  There was a big heavy swinging door that led to kitchen, and most of the time the door was left open.  Next to the door way to the kitchen was a little desk which the telephone was on.  Along one wall there were two windows looking out to the side yard.  On the opposite wall was her buffet and next to the buffet was a doorway to the hall which led to the bedrooms and bathroom.   

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Grandma and Grandpa in their dining room in front of the secretary with the curved glass.  Grandma is blocking the curved glass. 

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Grandma’s dining room.  Grandma at the head of the table and my mother standing behind her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The front bedroom had a double bed, dresser, and a cedar chest.  It had two windows to the front which looked out to the front porch.  When I was a kid, I liked to climb through them to the porch.  In the back bedroom were a chest of drawers, a double bed, and Grandma’s treadle sewing machine.  The kitchen had a sink on one wall, a table in front of the window.  The opposite wall had a cabinet and stove.  The pantry door was next to the stove.  Her pantry was filled with everything.  Dishes, pots, pans, food, and a dresser full of recipes that she had cut out of newspapers and magazines.  On the back wall was window and a door to the basement and outside.  When you walked out the door there was a landing and straight ahead was the refrigerator.  A turn to the right was five or six stairs down to the back door.  If you turned around there were five or six more stairs to the basement.  This house had a coal furnace and they had a room near the furnace that held the coal.  Grandpa would make sure the fire was going before he left for work and again when he came home and before he went to bed.  If it was really cold, Grandma had to feed it some coal during the day.  They finally got a gas furnace in the 1970’s, and that was only because they were forced to.  Coal had become hard to get and expensive because by this time no one had coal furnaces anymore.  In the basement grandma had another stove which she used on holidays and really hot days.  Her washer and dryer were down there too.  She didn’t always have a dryer and hung clothes outside or in the basement when it rained or was too cold to hang clothes outside.  She had a small room the size of a large walk in closet that she referred to as the fruit cellar.  In there she had all the things that she canned, plus canned goods she bought at the grocery store.  She had it very organized too, so when she sent me down for a can of beans, they were easy to find.

Of course, I remember holidays and other family gatherings at her house.  I remember walking in on Thanksgiving and smelling the turkey cooking.  She was a great cook so I always enjoyed meals there.  I remember the conversations and the laughter at our family gatherings.  It was a cozy house and grandma and grandpa always made us feel welcome.   I enjoyed this trip back in time to their home and hope you did too.

The old homestead was the topic for  52 ancestors in 52 weeks last week.  I’m a little late in posting it due to the Easter holiday.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

Misfortune

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John and Herman Desens farm on left side of road as it looks today.

Misfortune seems to have followed John Desens around. About six years before he was killed by his neighbor, Fred Zell, his son, Herman,  was killed when he accidently shot himself.

The latest victim of careless handling of guns is Herman Desens, a man about thirty years of age who lived with his father across from Fred Zell’s place west of town (Greenwood, Clark Co). Friday evening, Oct. 18, 1901 as the two were about to leave the clearing where they had been working, the young man went after his shot gun, which he had left nearby standing against a log. He seized the gun by the muzzle and drew it toward him, and in doing so the hammer cocked, discharging the load of one barrel into his breast. The father hearing the shot, looked up, but noticing his son standing thought nothing of the shot and stooped to his work, when he heard his son give an exclamation and saw him start for the house. The man only went a few yards when he dropped to the ground dead. The funeral occurred at the cemetery on the West Side Sunday afternoon. Deceased, with his father, came to Greenwood about two years ago and have lived together on their small clearing.[1]

Another account is from Marshfield Times October 25, 1901.

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Family story was they were killed by Indians.  It looks like the family stories were wrong.

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst


[1] From website: http://www.wiclarkcountyhistory.org/warner/history/Pioneers/indexY.htm

Lucky Date Book

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The topic this week for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks is lucky.  “Do you have an ancestor who was lucky at something? Lucky to be alive? Lucky at cards? Lucky in love? Maybe you have an ancestor with a name that reminds you of luck or fortune. There’s always “luck of the Irish.” Maybe you have a story of how luck played a role in finding an ancestor.”

I have racked my brain trying to come up with a lucky ancestor.  So instead of a lucky ancestor, I decided that I would write about my luck that my grandmother kept good records.  My grandmother kept a date book and sometimes she made comments on the pages.  Her dates are mostly correct, and I love her comments.  This datebook has helped me find her parents, grandparents, and cousins.  Plus my grandfather’s family.

Here are some excerpts from the Date book.

 Inscribed inside:

“To Mother on her birthday Dec. 3rd 1944, With Love, Dot.” 

Jan 1 — Charles Steinhauser 1898 – Fred’s cousin on his mother’s side Aunt Barbara’s son.  Died in 1962.

Jan 2 – Dear Brother Ralph C. Bowers born June 18, 1897 in Chicago, Illinois.  Died on January 5th 1963 after having a stroke on January 2, 1963.  Had heart attack a year or so before.

Jan 4 — Gregory August born on this day – Gail and Bruce’s child weighed in over 8lbs.  One wonderful boy!

Jan 6 – Grandpa Kaiser died on this date in 1933.  He was a kind person and we were sorry to see him go.  69 years old – Rudolph Kaiser

Jan 20 – Grandma Reinhardt – Anna Maria’s Birthdate.  Died June 11, 1910 (nee Schweppler).

Feb 10 – Aunt Elizabeth Louise — Born in South Amana, Iowa 1881.  Aunt Liz passed away Aug 5th 1966 5:20 PM on Friday.  Buried in Ottawa on Aug 9th 1966

Feb 14 – Born Eva Fredericka Reinhardt Feb 4, 1877 Nussellock Germany – Died Dec 23, 1941.

Feb 20 – 1971 Abigail Helen married Bruce A at Calvary U. M. Church at 5pm. In a candlelight service that was beautiful.  May god keep and bless them always.

March 17 –Julius Reinhardt – Cousin – In service 1945

March 28 – Mark Lynn Reinhardt – Cousin – In the Marines, some place in the South Pacific 1945.

April 3 – Our baby Richard was born on this date in 1930. Lived just 11 days.  Premature by two and half months.

April 5 – Birthdate of my father and also Fred’s father.  Robert Bowers. Rudolph Kaiser.

June 11 – Our third baby boy (still born) on this date in 1933.  Very Premature.

July 1 – Birthday of our daughter Dorothy La Von 1924  Born Tuesday 10:35 pm.  Grant Hospital – Chicago, Illinois 6lbs 5 oz.

July 12 – Ronnie’s birthday 1955.  May god guide him in all ways.

July 14 – And they did it.  Dot and George were married here at home at 5:00pm on Saturday by Pastor Beigner of Elmhurst.  Their attendants were Joe and Velma Mitchell a very dear couple.  Guests were Fran and Pat, Ralph and Helen, Liz and Tim, Mr. and Mrs. Manfroid, Mr. and Mrs. Beischer, and Donnie.  Eighteen in all.  And a nice time was had by all.

July 16 – Our anniversary.  Fred and I were married on this day in 1923.  Dr. Fred M. Doyle gave me away.  By Pastor A. Meyer.  Went to Wisconsin Dells for honeymoon.

Oct 9 – Our second great-grandson born at Delnor Hospital this day.  Weighed in at 7 lbs.  Brian Andrew to our dear granddaughter and her good husband.  May god continue to bless all four of them always. First great grandson Gregory A.

Dec 16 – Mother suffered stroke on this day in 1941 and passed away one week later.  Terrible, terrible day.

Dec 17 – Birthday of Grandma Kaiser (Wilhelmina Springer) Fred’s mother.

Dec 23—Mother passed away at the Columbus Hospital at about 1:30 pm on Tuesday 1941.  Can’t begin to say how much I miss her.

As you can see this is a goldmine of information for a genealogist.  She identifies people for example she said Mark Reinhardt – Cousin.  She writes when her mother was born and where.  She also writes when her mother died, in what hospital she died in, the time, and year.  She writes about two premature babies she had that died.  I left a lot out and only wrote a few entries to show how she kept records.  I feel very, very lucky to have inherited this book.  I have used it a lot over the years.  She left other items to me also such as letters, cards, post cards, document, etc.  I wish I had such items from all sides of my family tree.  Thank-you Grandma, and I think you would love some of the information I have gathered on your family over the years. 

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst