Did Alma have a secret marriage?

Albert Grunst and Family

Alma Grunst

My pet peeve is finding my ancestors attached to wrong online family trees.  I found this several times over the past few months.  I contacted one that had my grandfather connected to her family tree, and I asked her to remove it because it looked like my grandfather was a bigamist.  To her credit she took him off and put the right one on her family tree.  So far the others I have contacted still have the wrong ancestor on their family tree.  Some people may  think who cares or does it really matter.  Someday when we are all gone and those family trees are still online who is going to be around to correct the error without in-depth research.  It took a whole evening to sort out the one below.  For awhile I thought my husband’s aunt had a secret marriage, however as it turns out there are two people with the name Alma Grunst.  If this person had done her research this mistake would not have happened.  I laid it all out for her and still she leaves my husband’s Aunt attached to her family tree.    In addition to the documentation, my husband remembers his Aunt and cousins.   

Below I laid out a timeline for each Alma.  My husband’s Aunt Alma belongs to Albert Grunst and Anna Schmerling.  The Other Alma belongs to Fred and Pauline Grunst.

Parents Albert and Anna Grunst

Time Line for their daughter Alma Grunst

1888 — Alma Grunst born to Albert and Anna Schmerling. [1]

1900 – Census Alma is living in Chicago, Illinois with her parents  Albert and Anna Grunst plus her siblings Albert Jr., Walter, Lillian.[2] 

1910 – Cenus Alma is living in Cicero, Illinois with her parents Albert and Anna Grunst plus her siblings Albert Jr., Walter, Lillian, and Elmer.[3]

1914 – Alma marries Max Weihs[4]

1920 – Alma Grunst Weihs is living in Cicero, Illinois with her husband Max and two children Dorothy and Elmer.[5]

1959 Alma Weihs died.[6]

Parents Fred and Pauline Grunst

Time Line for daughter Alma Grunst

1889 – Alma Grunst born to Fred and Pauline Grunst. [7]

1900 – Census Alma is living in Chicago with her parents Fred and Lina Grunst plus siblings Martha, Anna, Lena, and Clara[8]

1908 – Alma marries Henry Mergan.[9]

1910 – Census Alma Mergan is living in Chicago, Illinois with her husband Henry, and her son Frederick.[10]

1915 – Henry Mergan died.[11]

1920 Alma Mergan is living in Chicago, Illinois with her mother Pauline Grunst, Sister Martha, and son Frederick.[12]

1971 Alma Mergan died.[13]

This is why you evaluate the evidence in each document and cite your sources.  Genealogy 101 — Cite your sources, cite your sources, cite your sources.

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst


[1] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data: “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.”Illinois. Cook County Birth Registers, 1871–1915.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. Illinois. Cook County Birth Registers, 1871–1915. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[2] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[3]Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 20A; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.  Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[4] Source Information Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871–1920.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health records. “Marriage Records, 1871–present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

[5] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 54.  Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).

[6] Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

[7] Source Information:  Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.  Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

[8] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 9, Cook, Illinois; Page: 11; Enumeration District: 0226.  Source Information:

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[9] Ancestry.com. Indiana, Marriages, 1810-2001 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Original data: Indiana, Marriages, 1810-2001. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.

[10]Source Citation:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Chicago Ward 11, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_252; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0551; FHL microfilm: 1374265

Source Information:Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.  Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[11] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Deaths Index, 1878-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  Illinois, Cook County Deaths 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health. “Birth and Death Records, 1916–present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

[12] Year: 1920; Census Place: Chicago Ward 34, Cook (Chicago), Illinois; Roll: T625_354; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 2148

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).

[13] Source Information:  Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.  Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

 

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Love from France

This weeks 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks topic is Valentines.  

Below is a card sent to my Grandmother, Helen Desens, by my Grandfather, George Manfroid, from France during WWI.  He went there in 1918 and came home in January 1919 so I assume the card was sent sometime in 1918.  I don’t think it was sent for Valentines Day.  They got married shortly after he came home in 1919.  I love this card.  It is so pretty and delicate.

Valentine one

This is the front and the flap opens and there is a clover inside and a small card.  I don’t know if the clover was originally a four-leaf clover because it is crumbling.  

Valentine two

Here it is with the flap open and you can see the clover and the small card.

Valentine three

This is the small card.

Valentine four

As you can see the card is a post card.  He must have mailed it in an envelope because there is no writing on the card.  It seems too delicate to send as post card.

He also sent another one that says “Souvenir de France”.

Souvenir de France

The flap opens on this one too and there is a small card inside.

Souvenir de France two

The small card.

Souvenir de France (2)

The back of the Souvenir de France card.

And finally here are Grandpa and Grandma

Grandpa Manfroid      img005 (2)

Copyright ©  2017 Gail Grunst

Augusta is Majestic and Grand

Augusta Desens and Family

Emma, Hank, Augusta, Helen and Ann

 

This week the topic for 52 ancestors in 52 weeks is favorite name.

My grandmother’s middle name, Augusta, has always been a favorite of mine.  It also happens to be the name of my great-grandmother, Augusta Desens. “The name Augusta is a Latin baby name. In Latin the meaning of the name Augusta is: Majestic, grand. The feminine form of Augustus; meaning majestic dignity or venerable, originally given to female relatives of Roman emperors. Famous bearer: British King George III’s mother was named Augusta.”[1] It is interesting that Augusta means majestic, grand because that is how I picture my great-grandmother.  If I had girls, I was planning on naming one Augusta.  My boys tell me they are glad they weren’t girls, although one has the middle name August.  I thought it would go well with our last name Grunst.  Augusta Desens is another ancestor that very little was handed down in the way of stories.  She died when my dad was young, so he didn’t remember her very well.  My grandmother, Helen Augusta, died before I was born so she could not tell me stories of her mother or her childhood.  All I have are the vital statistics and the little I can piece together through records.

Augusta Gabbi was born 28 January 1859 in Berlin Germany.[2]  She married Carl Desens in Germany date unknown.[3]  I estimate that they were married around 1883.[4]  This estimate is from the 1910 census which states they were married 27 years at that time.[5] So far I have been unable to find a record of their marriage. Augusta and Carl came from Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, Maryland, USA on April 22, 1888 aboard the ship Main.[6]  Augusta and Carl settled in Forest Park, Illinois.[7]  They attended St. Paul Lutheran Church[8] and St. John Lutheran Church in Forest Park, Illinois.[9]  At that time the sermons were conducted in German.  Carl and Augusta had eight children, Emma, Bertha, Mina, Louise, William, Henry, Ann, and Helen.[10] [11] Emma and Bertha were born in Germany, the rest were born in Illinois.[12] [13] The children grew up in Forest Park and attended St. John Lutheran School.[14]  Carl worked as a stationary fireman for the Public Service Company.[15] Augusta kept house and raised the children.[16] On the 1900 census there is Dorothea Zoschke listed as Carl’s mother-in-law living with them.[17]  This would be Augusta’s mother, but her name is not Gabbi (Gabbie, Gabbei).  It lists Dorothea as a widow, her birth year as 1828, her age as 72, and year of immigration as 1890.[18]  I found a Dorothea Gabbei coming to the US on 27 May 1890 from Bremen and Southhampton to New York aboard the ship Elbe.[19]  She is 64 years old and her occupation is a Gentleman’s Servant.[20]  There is a two year age difference between the documents, but the year of immigration is the same.  She must have married here in the US, but I have been unable to find a record of it. Dorothea died in 1901 and is buried in Concordia Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois.[21] Carl died on 12 January 1921.[22]  Augusta died 7 July 1925 in West Suburban Hospital in Oak Park, Illinois of chronic interstitial nephritis and hypertension at 66 years, 5months, and 9 days.[23]  Both Carl and Augusta are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois.[24]  I wish I had some stories of Augusta, but at least I have some old faded, and spotted pictures of her.  It’s an old fashioned name and maybe it will become popular again.   Maybe someday a descendant will name one of their children Augusta.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________________

[1] From website http://www.sheknows.com/baby-names/name/augusta

[2] State of Illinois, county of Cook, city of Oak Park, Standard Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. no. 4318, Registration no. 305.  Death record for Augusta Desens.

[3] Ibid

[4] Year: 1910; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_240; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1374253.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[5] Ibid.

[6] The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Records of the US Customs Service, RG36; NAI Number: 2655153; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. Baltimore, Passenger Lists, 1820-1964 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.  Original data: Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests. National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7] Illinois, Cook, Forest Park, Forest Park Review, July 18, 1925, Pg. 1. (front Page).  Obituary for Augusta Desens

[8] Ibid.

[9] Illinois, Cook, Forest Park, St. John Lutheran Church, St John Congregational books 1887 0 1905, Pg. 70 #1711 22, Pg. 85 #1888 28, Pg. 100 #2/278 51.

[10] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[11] Year: 1910; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_240; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1374253.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[12] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[13] Year: 1910; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_240; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1374253.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[14] Told to Author by George Manfroid and Louis Schultz, grandsons of Augusta Desens.

[15] State of Illinois, County of Cook, City of Chicago, Standard Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. No. 3104, Registration no. 1050.  Death record of Carl Desens.

[16] Year: 1910; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_240; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1374253.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[17] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[18] Ibid.

[19] Year: 1890; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 549; Line: 12; List Number: 732.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.  Original data:  Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: 6256867. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[20] Ibid.

[21] Ancestry.com. U.S., Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, Records, 1875-1940 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. ELCA, Birth, Marriage, Deaths. Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, Chicago, Illinois.

[22] State of Illinois, County of Cook, City of Chicago, Standard Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. No. 3104, Registration no. 1050.  Death record of Carl Desens.

[23] State of Illinois, county of Cook, city of Oak Park, Standard Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. no. 4318, Registration no. 305.  Death record for Augusta Desens.

[24] Cemertery Records, Woodlawn Cemetery, 7600 West Cermak Road, Forest Park, Illinois, Woodland Section, Part 4, Lot 711, graves 4 & 5.

Finding Albert Grunst in the Census Records

Albert Grunst and FamilyAlbert Grunst was born in Jugelow, Pommern, Germany (now Poland) on 5 June 1853[1] to Henrich Grunst and Wilhelmina Greinke.[2]  He came to the United States around 1881[3]or 1882[4] and married Anna Schmerling on 2 October 1886 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois.[5]  Albert became a Citizen of the United States in 1890.[6] Albert and Anna had seven children, Albert Jr.,[7] [8] Emma,[9] Theodore,[10] Walter,[11] [12] Lillian,[13] [14] Alma[15] [16] and Elmer[17] all born in Illinois.[18] [19]Albert and Anna resided in Chicago[20] and sometime between 1902[21] and 1910 moved to Cicero, Illinois.[22]  Albert worked as laborer for a lumber company,[23]  and Anna kept house and raised the children. Only five of the seven children grew to adulthood.[24] [25]  Emma and Theodore died young.[26] Alma was a sealer in a coffee house,[27] Albert Jr. worked as a house painter, Lillian worked a comptometer at Western Electric Company, Walter was a Laborer in a Piano Factory, and Elmer was a Draftsman at Western Electric Company.[28]  Anna died 22 April 1926 at age 61 years, 3 months and 24 days in St. Mary’s Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.[29]  By 1930 Albert was living at the Altenheim Old People’s Home[30] in Arlington Heights, Illinois.[31] My husband has some vague memories of visiting his grandfather in the old people’s home.  He had to be six or under when he visited, and all he remembers is a big grandfather clock ticking.  He doesn’t remember his grandfather.  Albert lived at Altenheim until his death 8 February 1947at age 93 years, 8 months, 3 days.[32] [33]  Anna and Albert are buried next to each other in Bethania Cemetery in Justice, Illinois.[34]

Above is a short biography of Albert Grunst.  As with any non-fiction writing, the sources are cited at the end.  There were many sources used, however the census records were used the most to put together this snapshot of Albert’s life.  Unfortunately, there are no family stories of Albert or his wife Anna.  Census records were used to find the following information:

  • Year of immigration
  • Place of birth
  • Names of Children
  • Place of birth of Children
  • Approximate birth Years
  • Approximate date of marriage
  • Approximate age at marriage
  • Approximate date of naturalization.
  • Occupations
  • Places of work
  • Addresses
  • Approximate dates of address changes
  • Approximate death date
  • Name changes of institutions.

By getting some approximate dates from census records 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940, this helped me to find other records with more exact information.  In some cases, I just had to be satisfied with the census records. If interested, see the full citations below.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________________

[1] Ancestry.com. Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data:  “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916–1947.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original records.

[2] Neu Jugelow, Kreis Stolp, Pommern, Germany, Birth and baptismal records from the Evangelical church parish of Lupow, Kreis Stolp, Germany for 1846. (Now Lupava, Poland) From the Polish State Archives in Koszalin

[3] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[4] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 54

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[5] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871–1920.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health records. “Marriage Records, 1871–present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

[6] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 54

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[7] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[8] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[9] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[10] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[11] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[12] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[13] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[14] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[15] Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data:  “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009. Illinois. Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1922. Illinois Department of Public Health. Division of Vital Records, Springfield.

[16] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[17] Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[18] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[19] Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[20]Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[21] Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

[22] Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[25] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 54

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[26] Year: 1900; Census Place: Chicago Ward 10, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 256; Page: 17; Enumeration District: 0288; FHL microfilm: 1240256

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

[27] Year: 1910; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_238; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 1539; FHL microfilm: 1374251

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the

[28] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 54.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[29] State of Illinois, County of Cook, City of Chicago, Department of Public Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Standard Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. No. 3104, Registered No. 13052.

[30] It appears that “Altenheim Old People’s Home” name was changed to “Evangelical Lutheran Old Peoples Home” (See 1940 Federal Census) and by 1978 it was the “Lutheran Home and Service for the Aged” according to a letter written to Mrs George Schwarz, a relative also researching Albert, dated March 9, 1978 and shared with Gail Grunst.

[31] Year: 1930; Census Place: Wheeling, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 499; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 2105; FHL microfilm: 2340234

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

[32] Year: 1940; Census Place: Wheeling, Cook, Illinois; Roll: m-t0627-00777; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 16-162.  Source Information: 

Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

[33] Ancestry.com. Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data:”Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916–1947.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original records.

[34] Cemetery records of Bethania Cemetery, 7701 S. Archer Road, Justice, Illinois, 60478, Burial record of Anna and Albert Grunst Lot 9 Sec 2 Division 3. 

Invitation to Dinner

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Elmer Grunst 1901 – 1965

If I could invite any ancestor to dinner it would not be one of mine, but one of my husbands.  I would invite his father.  The reason is that I never met him.  I knew the rest of the family, but he passed away before I met my husband.  My husband’s family consisted of four boys and one girl.  The children were spread over 20 years, my husband being the youngest.

I would set the table with my best china and silverware and make his favorite dish, if I knew what it was.  I only know what I have heard from my husband and other relatives. Sometimes the stories I have heard contradict themselves.  During dinner, I would ask a couple of questions about his life, and hope that by asking a couple of questions the conversation would evolve and he would just voluntarily offer information.  I would not want it to seem like an interrogation.  I would want to enjoy his company, and I would tell him about our life and his grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  I would tell him that he should be proud that he raised a good daughter and sons, especially my husband.  He would probably know how the older ones turned out, and he might have a good idea how my husband turned out too.  But I would tell him anyway.  I would like to observe my husband and his father together, and hear them reminisce.  Below is a list of questions I would like to ask him.  I have asked my husband some of these questions, but he doesn’t know or has forgotten.

  • What was it like growing up during the early 1900’s?
  • I know your parent’s lived in Chicago and moved to Cicero. Do you know what year they moved to Cicero?
  • Did they own their own house or rent?
  • What was the house like?
  • Did you go to school in Cicero?
  • Which school did you go to?
  • How far did you go in school?
  • What were your favorite subjects?
  • What games did you play as a kid?
  • Did you have a best friend? What was his name?
  • How close were you with your brothers and sisters?
  • Did you go to Church?
  • What was your religion growing up?
  • Did you change religions when you got married?
  • Did you make your older children go to church?
  • If so, what church did they attend?
  • Did your parents talk about coming to America?
  • If so, what was their experience and why did they leave the country of their origin?
  • What country, province, and town did they come from?
  • Do you know how your parents met?
  • Did you have Aunts and Uncles and what were their names?
  • Did you have cousins and did you associate with them?
  • Tell me about your parents.
  • When did you learn to drive?
  • What was your first car?
  • How did you meet Alice?
  • How did it feel to get married at 19 years old?
  • How did it feel to be a father at 20?
  • What kind of job did you have at that time?
  • Where did you live?
  • When did you move to Berwyn?
  • What were your favorite pastimes/hobbies?
  • Did you like sports?
  • What were your favorite foods and drink?
  • Did you like your job at Western Electric?
  • Did the Depression affect you at all?
  • What was it like to have two sons in World War II?
  • Are you conservative or liberal?
  • Who did you vote for over the years?
  • What did you think when you learned you were going to be a father again at 40?
  • Do you have any regrets about your life?
  • Would you have done anything differently, if you could do it again?

That seems like a lot of questions, and I probably wouldn’t have to ask them all.  Like I said, I would hope by asking about one or two it would lead the conversation around to some of the questions being answered naturally in the course of the conversation.  Our evening would end with hug and a promise to do this again.  Over time and several dinners we would get to know one another and feel comfortable with each other.  He would tell more stories and more of my questions would be answered.

This is a typical genealogical interview leaving out questions about vital statistics because I already have that information.  I have found that I get much more information out of people if I ask a couple of questions and let them talk.

This is a lesson for all of us to ask our older family member these questions or ones like them before it’s too late.  Also, it might be a good idea to record your own answers to questions like the ones above for your children and their children.  A good book to get you started is To Our Children’s Children by Bob Greene.  He has a lot of questions in his book to get you thinking. Many times we are so busy digging into our ancestors lives, we don’t write down our own stories.  This is a reminder to me too, to get busy on mine. Happy writing!

*Week four challenge Dinner Invite  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

Great-Grandma and Grandpa Beischer long life and marriage.

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Grandma Beischer is in the middle

When I was growing up my grandfather’s parents lived with him.  When we went to visit Grandpa, we also visited with my great-grandparents too.  They were known to me as Grandma and Grandpa Beischer.  Grandma Beischer was 77 years old when I was born, and she could not walk very well.  It seemed to me that she was in a wheel chair most of the time, although she could walk with the assistance of special shoes and a cane. She had been in an accident that left one leg shorter than the other one.  I remember going with my father when he would take her for shoes.  We went to a store that custom-made her shoes by building up one shoe so her legs would be even when she walked.  One time I remember that we went to the shoe place in Chicago and then visited her son, Arthur, who owned a tavern in Chicago.  When I was eight, my grandfather died and left his house to my father.  My father let his Grandparents stay in the house.  Grandma Beischer was quiet and aloof.  She sometimes seemed kind of crabby so I always kept my distance. She was a hard person to get to know.   Grandpa Beischer was the opposite, outgoing and happy-go-lucky.

There are many stories about Grandpa and his escapades.  Grandpa was fond of his drink and felt no pain a lot of time.  During prohibition he made his own liquor, and I heard it was pretty strong stuff. Grandma did not approve of his gallivanting and drinking.  I guess she gave him you-know-what when he came home.  During prohibition, Grandma and Grandpa lived one of those city houses with a flight of stairs up to the back porch and door.  One time, Grandpa’s friends brought him home so drunk he couldn’t stand up, and his toupee kept falling off, so his friends stuck his toupee on backwards with chewing gum and tied a rope behind Grandpa to keep him from falling backward down the stairs.  Then they knocked on the door and ran.  When Grandma answered the door, Grandpa fell in.    When he woke up the next morning, he could not get the toupee off.  He had to ride the bus with his toupee on backwards to some place that could remove it.

Because of Grandma’s handicap, Grandpa did the house cleaning, washing clothes, dishes, and cooking.  He didn’t drive and had to take public transportation or get a ride from someone.   My father would cut the grass, shovel the snow, do minor repairs on the house.  My mother would take Grandpa to the store and to run errands.  Both my parents would take Grandma and Grandpa to see relatives or have them over to our house.  As they got older, it became more obvious that the day was coming when other arrangements were going to have to be made for their care. Grandpa could not see very well.  To find an electrical outlet, he would run his hands along the wall feeling for the outlet, and then stick his long finger nails in the plug.  Another time he was vacuum cleaning and banged the vacuum into the TV screen and broke it.  When he washed dishes, he didn’t get them clean anymore.  We began to refuse food or drink when we visited.  My mother would say, “It’s a wonder that they haven’t been electrocuted, set the house on fire, or died of ptomaine poisoning.”  One time Grandpa got a sliver in his hand, and by the time my mother saw it, there was a red streak going up his arm.   My mother took him to the doctor, and at 80 years old this was Grandpa’s first time to a doctor.  The doctor said to him, “Grandpa we are going to have to give you a shot.”  At that point, Grandpa stood up, pulled up his pants, looked around and said, “Where’s the bar?”  Doctor said, “Not that kind of shot, Grandpa.”  A few months later Grandma and Grandpa went to live with her daughter, Christine.  My father sold the house and a couple of years later Grandpa died and a few months later Grandma died.

Mary Fiderius was born 1 July 1870 in Allentown, Pennsylvania to Peter Fiderius and Christine Oberdoester.[1]   Mary had a sister Theresa and two brothers Leonard and Joseph.[2] She married George Manfroid on 5 February 1889 in Cleveland, Ohio.[3]  George and Mary moved back forth between Cleveland, Pittsburg, and Toledo during the 1890’s, and settled in Chicago around 1900.[4]  They had seven children, Laura[5] (died in infancy), George, Christine, Philip, Isidor (died at age 2)[6], Arthur, and Theodore.[7] I estimate that sometime between 1906 and 1910 George and Mary divorced.  I arrived at this estimation because their last child was born in 1906 and by 1910 two of Mary’s children are living in homes.  Arthur was living at St. Mary’s training school for boys in Wheeling Township, Illinois,[8] and Theodore was living at St. Vincent’s Infant Asylum in Chicago, Illinois.[9] The reason for the divorce is unknown, and I have been unable to find papers.  It was always known to family that Grandma Beischer was divorced and that Adam was her second husband,  On 22 April 1911 Mary married Adam Beischer.[10] At some point Mary got her sons back.  Mary and Adam had no children of their own.

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Grandpa Beischer being silly

Adam was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 5 July 1879. [11]  He came to Chicago, Illinois in 1891 at age 11 and lived there for 15 years. He moved in 1906 to west suburban towns finally settling in Elmhurst, Illinois.  He was employed by the American Can Company for 25 years working as a supervisor in the research department.  Adam died on 7 May 1962 at age 82 years, 10 months, and 2 days.  Adam is buried at Chapel Hill Cemetery in Elmhurst, Illinois.[12]  Mary died seven months later on 26 December 1962 at age 92 years, five months, 25 days.  At the time of her death, Mary was survived by two sons, her daughter, 13 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and 2 great-great grandchildren.[13] Mary was laid to rest next to Adam at Chapel Hill Cemetery in Elmhurst, Illinois, and they are together in death as they were in life.  Adam and Mary not only had longevity in life but also in their marriage of 51 years.

Finding Great Grandpa

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________________

[1] Recorded in author’s baby book by Dorothy Manfroid as told to her by Mary Fiderius Manfroid Beischer in 1947.

[2] Letter from Erick Fiderius (great-grandson of  Joseph Fiderius) to Author Gail Grunst dated January 6, 1997 outlining the family relationships.

[3] Cuyahoga County Archive; Cleveland, Ohio; Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records, 1810-1973; Volume: Vol 31-32; Year Range: 1887 Jul – 1888 Jun 1889

[4] Various city directories for Cleveland, Toledo, Pittsburg, and Chicago.

[5] Pennsylvania Births and Christenings, 1709-1950,” database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2JV-3FC : 9 December 2014), Mary Manfroid in entry for Laura Manfroid, 13 Dec 1889; Birth, citing Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 499,282.

[6] Illinois, Cook, Chicago, Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Undertakers report of death dated 22 March 1901.

[7] Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003, Ancestry.com,Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data – The New York Times. New York, NY, USA: The New York Times, 1851-2001.The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, CA, USA: The Los Angeles Times, 1881-1894.The Boston Globe.

[8] Year: 1910; Census Place: Wheeling, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_241; Page: 21B; Enumeration District: 0132; FHL microfilm: 1374254

Source Information  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[9] United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MKNW-CZ5 : accessed 22 January 2018), Theodore Maniford, Chicago Ward 21, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 923, sheet 16B, family , NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 264; FHL microfilm 1,374,277.

[10] Illinois, Cook, Oak Park, Oak Park Leaves, May 17, 1962, pg. 76.  Obituary for Adam Beischer.

[11] Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

[12] Illinois, Cook, Oak Park, Oak Park Leaves, May 17, 1962, pg. 76.  Obituary for Adam Beischer.

[13] Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003, Ancestry.com,Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge

I’m doing Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.  My post The Mother-In-Law was the start.  This weeks challenge is to write about a favorite photo.  I thought this would be easy, but I have spent a lot of time trying to decide which one is my favorite.  There are so many of them that it was hard to decide.  Finally, I settled on one of my mother and Santa Claus.  It seemed appropriate since we just celebrated Christmas a few weeks ago.  

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The picture was taken in December 1929 when my mother was five years old.  I assume it was taken in Chicago, Illinois because that is where they lived at that time.  There is the number 742 in the picture.  Could that be how they kept track of the pictures, and it was picture number 742?  I love her bobbed hair, and Santa’s beard sure looks fake!  It’s hard to image my mother believing is Santa Claus or for that matter being five years old.  I wonder what she asked him to bring her for Christmas.  It looks like she might be holding something in her hand.  There is not much else to say about the picture, it speaks for itself.  Having spent many Christmas’ with my mother’s family, I can picture them celebrating Christmas 1929.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst