Great-Grandma and Grandpa Beischer long life and marriage.

img004 (2)

Grandma Beischer is in the middle

When I was growing up my grandfather’s parents lived with him.  When we went to visit Grandpa, we also visited with my great-grandparents too.  They were known to me as Grandma and Grandpa Beischer.  Grandma Beischer was 77 years old when I was born, and she could not walk very well.  It seemed to me that she was in a wheel chair most of the time, although she could walk with the assistance of special shoes and a cane. She had been in an accident that left one leg shorter than the other one.  I remember going with my father when he would take her for shoes.  We went to a store that custom-made her shoes by building up one shoe so her legs would be even when she walked.  One time I remember that we went to the shoe place in Chicago and then visited her son, Arthur, who owned a tavern in Chicago.  When I was eight, my grandfather died and left his house to my father.  My father let his Grandparents stay in the house.  Grandma Beischer was quiet and aloof.  She sometimes seemed kind of crabby so I always kept my distance. She was a hard person to get to know.   Grandpa Beischer was the opposite, outgoing and happy-go-lucky.

There are many stories about Grandpa and his escapades.  Grandpa was fond of his drink and felt no pain a lot of time.  During prohibition he made his own liquor, and I heard it was pretty strong stuff. Grandma did not approve of his gallivanting and drinking.  I guess she gave him you-know-what when he came home.  During prohibition, Grandma and Grandpa lived one of those city houses with a flight of stairs up to the back porch and door.  One time, Grandpa’s friends brought him home so drunk he couldn’t stand up, and his toupee kept falling off, so his friends stuck his toupee on backwards with chewing gum and tied a rope behind Grandpa to keep him from falling backward down the stairs.  Then they knocked on the door and ran.  When Grandma answered the door, Grandpa fell in.    When he woke up the next morning, he could not get the toupee off.  He had to ride the bus with his toupee on backwards to some place that could remove it.

Because of Grandma’s handicap, Grandpa did the house cleaning, washing clothes, dishes, and cooking.  He didn’t drive and had to take public transportation or get a ride from someone.   My father would cut the grass, shovel the snow, do minor repairs on the house.  My mother would take Grandpa to the store and to run errands.  Both my parents would take Grandma and Grandpa to see relatives or have them over to our house.  As they got older, it became more obvious that the day was coming when other arrangements were going to have to be made for their care. Grandpa could not see very well.  To find an electrical outlet, he would run his hands along the wall feeling for the outlet, and then stick his long finger nails in the plug.  Another time he was vacuum cleaning and banged the vacuum into the TV screen and broke it.  When he washed dishes, he didn’t get them clean anymore.  We began to refuse food or drink when we visited.  My mother would say, “It’s a wonder that they haven’t been electrocuted, set the house on fire, or died of ptomaine poisoning.”  One time Grandpa got a sliver in his hand, and by the time my mother saw it, there was a red streak going up his arm.   My mother took him to the doctor, and at 80 years old this was Grandpa’s first time to a doctor.  The doctor said to him, “Grandpa we are going to have to give you a shot.”  At that point, Grandpa stood up, pulled up his pants, looked around and said, “Where’s the bar?”  Doctor said, “Not that kind of shot, Grandpa.”  A few months later Grandma and Grandpa went to live with her daughter, Christine.  My father sold the house and a couple of years later Grandpa died and a few months later Grandma died.

Mary Fiderius was born 1 July 1870 in Allentown, Pennsylvania to Peter Fiderius and Christine Oberdoester.[1]   Mary had a sister Theresa and two brothers Leonard and Joseph.[2] She married George Manfroid on 5 February 1889 in Cleveland, Ohio.[3]  George and Mary moved back forth between Cleveland, Pittsburg, and Toledo during the 1890’s, and settled in Chicago around 1900.[4]  They had seven children, Laura[5] (died in infancy), George, Christine, Philip, Isidor (died at age 2)[6], Arthur, and Theodore.[7] I estimate that sometime between 1906 and 1910 George and Mary divorced.  I arrived at this estimation because their last child was born in 1906 and by 1910 two of Mary’s children are living in homes.  Arthur was living at St. Mary’s training school for boys in Wheeling Township, Illinois,[8] and Theodore was living at St. Vincent’s Infant Asylum in Chicago, Illinois.[9] The reason for the divorce is unknown, and I have been unable to find papers.  It was always known to family that Grandma Beischer was divorced and that Adam was her second husband,  On 22 April 1911 Mary married Adam Beischer.[10] At some point Mary got her sons back.  Mary and Adam had no children of their own.

img004 (3)

Grandpa Beischer being silly

Adam was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 5 July 1879. [11]  He came to Chicago, Illinois in 1891 at age 11 and lived there for 15 years. He moved in 1906 to west suburban towns finally settling in Elmhurst, Illinois.  He was employed by the American Can Company for 25 years working as a supervisor in the research department.  Adam died on 7 May 1962 at age 82 years, 10 months, and 2 days.  Adam is buried at Chapel Hill Cemetery in Elmhurst, Illinois.[12]  Mary died seven months later on 26 December 1962 at age 92 years, five months, 25 days.  At the time of her death, Mary was survived by two sons, her daughter, 13 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and 2 great-great grandchildren.[13] Mary was laid to rest next to Adam at Chapel Hill Cemetery in Elmhurst, Illinois, and they are together in death as they were in life.  Adam and Mary not only had longevity in life but also in their marriage of 51 years.

Finding Great Grandpa

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________________

[1] Recorded in author’s baby book by Dorothy Manfroid as told to her by Mary Fiderius Manfroid Beischer in 1947.

[2] Letter from Erick Fiderius (great-grandson of  Joseph Fiderius) to Author Gail Grunst dated January 6, 1997 outlining the family relationships.

[3] Cuyahoga County Archive; Cleveland, Ohio; Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records, 1810-1973; Volume: Vol 31-32; Year Range: 1887 Jul – 1888 Jun 1889

[4] Various city directories for Cleveland, Toledo, Pittsburg, and Chicago.

[5] Pennsylvania Births and Christenings, 1709-1950,” database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2JV-3FC : 9 December 2014), Mary Manfroid in entry for Laura Manfroid, 13 Dec 1889; Birth, citing Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 499,282.

[6] Illinois, Cook, Chicago, Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Undertakers report of death dated 22 March 1901.

[7] Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003, Ancestry.com,Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data – The New York Times. New York, NY, USA: The New York Times, 1851-2001.The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, CA, USA: The Los Angeles Times, 1881-1894.The Boston Globe.

[8] Year: 1910; Census Place: Wheeling, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_241; Page: 21B; Enumeration District: 0132; FHL microfilm: 1374254

Source Information  Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.

[9] United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MKNW-CZ5 : accessed 22 January 2018), Theodore Maniford, Chicago Ward 21, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 923, sheet 16B, family , NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 264; FHL microfilm 1,374,277.

[10] Illinois, Cook, Oak Park, Oak Park Leaves, May 17, 1962, pg. 76.  Obituary for Adam Beischer.

[11] Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

[12] Illinois, Cook, Oak Park, Oak Park Leaves, May 17, 1962, pg. 76.  Obituary for Adam Beischer.

[13] Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003, Ancestry.com,Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com

Advertisements

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge

I’m doing Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.  My post The Mother-In-Law was the start.  This weeks challenge is to write about a favorite photo.  I thought this would be easy, but I have spent a lot of time trying to decide which one is my favorite.  There are so many of them that it was hard to decide.  Finally, I settled on one of my mother and Santa Claus.  It seemed appropriate since we just celebrated Christmas a few weeks ago.  

img001 (3)

The picture was taken in December 1929 when my mother was five years old.  I assume it was taken in Chicago, Illinois because that is where they lived at that time.  There is the number 742 in the picture.  Could that be how they kept track of the pictures, and it was picture number 742?  I love her bobbed hair, and Santa’s beard sure looks fake!  It’s hard to image my mother believing is Santa Claus or for that matter being five years old.  I wonder what she asked him to bring her for Christmas.  It looks like she might be holding something in her hand.  There is not much else to say about the picture, it speaks for itself.  Having spent many Christmas’ with my mother’s family, I can picture them celebrating Christmas 1929.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

The Mother-In-Law

img001 (2)

Alice and Elmer Grunst

Back in 1975-76, I  Started to fill the blank spaces on the family tree in my children’s baby books with names, and noticed mine was almost filled and my husband’s almost empty. Both sets of his grandparents died before he was born or when he was a young child and he didn’t know very much about them.  I went to my mother-in-law and asked about her parents.   The first thing she asked, “Why, are you going to write a book?”  At the time, I thought it was a funny question because writing a book had never crossed my mind.  All I wanted was some names and dates.  She very reluctantly gave me her parent’s names, birth dates, and death dates.  I wrote them in the baby books and forgot about it for a while.  Then in 1979 I Started to do genealogy, and I made family group sheets for them and filed the information away.  For years it has sat in my filing cabinet while I have worked on my own side.  I don’t think my mother-in-law would like it, if she knew I was writing about her now.  But here goes anyway!

Alice Gorski[1] was born at the turn of the last century on 27 March 1900[2] in Cicero, Cook, Illinois[3] to Stanley Gorski[4] and Mary Witkowska.[5]  Both of Alice’s parents emigrated from Poland.[6] Her father came to the United States in 1891[7] and her mother in 1893.[8]  Stanislaus Gorski and Maryanna Witkowska were married in Chicago, Cook, Illinois on 28 May 1894.[9]  Stanley worked in a stone quarry[10] and for the railroad[11] to support eight children while Mary worked at home raising the children, cooking, and keeping house.[12]    Alice, along with her siblings, Joseph, John, Stanley, Constance, Chester, Leo and Felix[13] grew up in Cicero, Cook, Illinois.[14]  In 1900 when Alice was born there were two uncles, John Gorski and Adam Gorski, living in the household.[15]  Alice had an 8th grade education and after completing the 8th grade[16] worked in a Snuff factory.[17]  On 24 November 1920, Alice married Elmer Grunst also of Cicero, Cook, Illinois.[18]  They were married at  St Mary of Czestochowa  church in Cicero, Cook, Illinois.[19] Alice and Elmer had five children, Elmer Jr. in 1921,[20] Harry in 1922,[21] Dorothy in 1923,[22] Lester in 1936,[23] and Bruce in 1941.[24] Around 1929 Elmer and Alice bought a home in Berwyn, Cook, Illinois.[25]  There they raised their five children and spent the rest of their lives in the same house on Kenilworth Ave.[26]  Alice was the typical stay at home mother of the times.[27]  Elmer worked for Western Electric in Cicero, Illinois as a draftsman working his way up to a supervisor.[28]

The first time I met my future mother-in-law was in 1970 when she invited Bruce and I to dinner.  I guess she wanted to meet the girl her son was going to marry.  She was a spry 70 years old.  She cooked a great meal of stuffed Cornish hens.  I think it was the first time I ate a Cornish hen.  During the meal brother Harry came home, and he was feeling no pain, if you know what I mean.  But Harry is a story for another time.  After that meal, I had many more meals there during our courtship and early married life.  I loved some of the things she made, and my very favorite was her homemade Polish sausage.  I have never tasted Polish sausage as good as she made.  Her sister, Constance, would come over to her house and they would spend the day making sausages.  When we got married she paid off Bruce’s car for him.  She helped us with a down payment on our first house and bought us the refrigerator, washer, and dryer.  She could be very generous; however I think she wanted me to keep working to help support us.  When we announced that we were expecting our first child, she commented, “Oh no, now you will have to quit working.”  In 1974, women were just beginning to have both a career and a family.  I probably could have tried to do that, but I chose to stay home.  It took her a while; however she did to warm up to the idea because she called my mother to say, “Congratulations Grandma.”  Alice was already a grandma 6 times, so this was not a new experience for her as it was for my mother.  I must say that she sure did love our sons. 

When our first son was about six months old, we took a trip up to northern Wisconsin to visit relatives with Alice and Harry.  We stopped at a rest stop on the way to eat lunch and feed the baby.  I fed him almost a whole jar of baby food (his normal meal).  Grandma (as I referred to Alice after the kids were born) said, “You are feeding him too much food, and he is going to get sick.”  I told her, “No, I always feed him this much.”  Well, guess what?  He did get sick in the car and oh the smell and mess.  We were on the express way and had to wait until we could find a spot to pull over and clean him up and the car.  She didn’t say, “I told you so!” But I bet she was thinking it. 

Alice never saw any sense in traveling just to sight-see.  She believed the only reason to travel was to visit family or friends or do something like fishing.  Whenever we traveled anywhere she would ask, “What’s there?”

I asked my husband the other day, “What’s your favorite memory of your mother?”  His answer was, “Coming home from school for lunch. I liked talking with her as I ate.”  In 1978, Alice took a fall in her home and broke her hip.  Unfortunately, she was never the same after that.  While she was recuperating from hip surgery, she had a stroke which left her paralyzed on the opposite side of the repaired hip.  She had both sides that did not want to work, and she never walked again.  She spent the last three years of her life in a nursing home.  We would visit her every week no matter how difficult or inconvenient it could be at times.  She was so depressed and would tell us that she wanted to die.  It was so sad and difficult to hear her say that.  Before the fall, she was cleaning house, cooking, going up and down the basement stairs to wash cloths, grocery shopping, etc.  I thought she was so healthy and spunky that she would live to be in her 90’s.  But that was not to be. Alice passed away on 9 February 1981[29] just shy of her 81st birthday.  She is buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Stickney, Cook, Illinois.[30] She was quiet, shy, and a nice person who has been missed the past 37 years and loved deeply by her children and me.  Now that Alice has made her final trip, I have one question for her and that is, “What’s there?”

#52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

____________________________________________________________________________________
[1] On the 1900 and 1910 Federal Census’ Alice’s name is Polly and on the 1920 Federal Census it is Pelagia. We don’t know if her middle name was Alice or if she changed her name. 
[2] Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.  Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.
[3] Told to author, Gail Grunst, by Alice Grunst in 1979.
[4] Ibid.
[5] “Illinois Cook County Marriages 1871-1920,” Index, FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010.  Illinois Department of Public Health Records. “Marriage Records, 1871-Present.”  Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.
[6] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 65. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C
[7] Ibid.
[8] Ibid.
[9]  “Illinois Cook County Marriages 1871-1920,” Index, FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010.  Illinois Department of Public Health Records. “Marriage Records, 1871-Present.”  Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.
[10] Year: 1900; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 292; Page: 22A; Enumeration District: 1150; FHL microfilm: 1240292. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
[11] Year: 1920; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T625_359; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 65. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C
[12] Ibid.
[13] Ibid.
[14] Ibid.
[15] Year: 1900; Census Place: Cicero, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 292; Page: 22A; Enumeration District: 1150; FHL microfilm: 1240292. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
[16] Year: 1940; Census Place: Berwyn, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T627_772; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 16-5.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.
[17] Told by Alice Grunst to her son Bruce.
[18] State of Illinois, County of Cook, Chicago, Marriage License 888953,  Cook County Clerk’s office.
[19] State of Illinois, County of Cook, Chicago, Marriage License 888953,  Cook County Clerk’s office.
[20] Year: 1940; Census Place: Berwyn, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T627_772; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 16-5.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.
[21] Ibid
[22] Ibid
[23] Ibid.
[24] State of Illinois, Springfield, Department of Public health, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Birth Reg. # 106, Reg. dist. # 176.
[25] Ibid.
[26] Personal knowledge from son of Alice Grunst (husband of author).
[27] Ibid.
[28] Ibid.
[29] State of Illinois, Springfield, Illinois Department of Public Health, Office of Vital Records , Medical Certificate of Death, Reg. Dist. 16.21, Reg. No. 134.
[30] Ibid.

Almost 2018 Happy New Year!

It’s almost 2018 and 2017 is almost over.  I always like to review my blog at the end of each year.  I like to see what posts or pages people viewed and liked.  This year 2017 was not the biggest year for my blog.  I did’t do much writing.  I was busy with other projects and research.  I am putting a book together on my family tree, and I have done a lot of writing for it.  I feel some stories are too private to post on a blog.  I will keep one copy, and I plan on donating other copies to genealocical societies where my ancestors lived.  I just gave the blog a new look for 2018.  Let me know what you think of it. Thank you everyone for your encouragement, kind words, and for following this blog.  I hope to be more active in coming months.

Below are some fun statistics about this blog.

For 2017

I only listed the double digit ones.

This blog has been viewed from the following countries;

  • United States
  • Canada
  • Thailand
  • Germany
  • India
  • Phillipines
  • United Kingdom
  • France
  • Australia
  • South Africa
  • Finland
  • Hong Kong SAR China
  • Indonesia
  • Sweden
  • Czech Republic
  • South Korea
  • Netherlands
  • European Union
  • Israel
  • Peru
  • Luxenbourg

WordPress Daily Prompt

Happy New Year everyone!

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

Alexena Frazier Update

In the previous post of April 10, 2016 In Search of Alexena’s Parents, I wrote that according to the 1861 Canadian Census, Alexena was living with a person by the name of Isabella Thomas that I thought might be her sister.  As it turns out the Isabella that Alexena is living with in 1861 is not her sister.  The person that Alexena is living with is Isabella nee Davidson and she is married to Edward Thomas.[1]  Edward Thomas is the brother of George McK Thomas who is married to Isabella nee Frazier.[2]  Isabella Frazier’s parents are Hugh Frazier and Elizabeth McBean.  This is probably Alexena’s sister if Hugh and Elizabeth turn out to be her parents.

Recently, I found a family tree online at Ancestry.com that has a Catherine Frazer in it born in 1837 and her parents are listed as Hugh Fraser and Elizabeth McBain.[3]  Catherine was born in Ontario, Canada and married William Sexton in 1862.[4]  Catherine died in 1922 in Michigan.[5]   I found this tree by looking at my DNA matches.  The woman who posted the tree is my 4th to 6th cousin.  The paper or documented proof that Hugh and Elizabeth are Catherine’s parents is her marriage record,[6] and Hugh is listed on her death certificate.[7]

I noticed on the 1880 United States Federal Census that Catherine’s son, James, was born in Illinois.[8]  I then searched James Sexton and found that he was born in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois in 1866.[9] [10]  This places Catherine Frazer Sexton in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois in 1866 around the same time that Alexena came to Ottawa, Illinois.[11]  I did a search on the surname Sexton in Ottawa, Illinois between 1850 – 1870 and found a Mary A. Sexton age 18 on the 1860 Census keeping house for an Octavius Hanbury age 35 living in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.[12]  Next, I found a William Sexton (possibly Catherine’s husband) listed on the 1865 Illinois State Census in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.[13]  Unfortunately the 1865 Illinois State Census does not list every name, just head of household.  It does list one male and one female under 14 years of age, one male and one female over 20 but under the age of 30.[14]  Right above William Sexton’s name on the 1865 Census was Octavius Hanbury.[15]  Octavius listed one male over and one female over the age of 14 but under 20, one male over 30 but under 40, and one female over 40 but not over 50.[16]  This sent me on a search for Octavius Hanbury and found a Civil War Draft Registration Record for Octavius for the city of Ottawa, Illinois recorded 27 July 1863,[17] and a few names above Octavius’ were a William  Frazer born in Scotland age 22.[18]  Could this be a relative of Alexena’s, perhaps a brother?

To recap what I know:

  • Alexena was born in 1847 in Nassagaweya, Halton, Ontario, Canada to David Frazier and Catherine McBean according to her obituary[19] and death certificate.[20] I have been unable to find a David Frazer and Catherine McBean married to each other that were the right age to be her parents in Canada.
  • Found a Catherine Frazer in an online tree with parents name Hugh Frazer and Elizabeth McBean.
  • Person who posted the family tree with Catherine Frazer is a 4th to 6th cousin of mine according to our DNA results.
  • In 1837 Catherine Frazer was born in Ontario Canada.[21] Not old enough to be Alexena’s mother, but perhaps a sister.
  • On the 1860 Federal Census there is a Mary Sexton 18 year’s old living with an Octavius Hanbury in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois, and she is listed as his housekeeper.[22]
  • In 1862 Catherine Frazer married William Sexton in Canada.[23]
  • In 1863 Octavius Hanbury is listed on the Civil War Draft Registration for Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois. A few names above his name is listed a William Frazer born in 1844. [24] Maybe a relative of Alexena’s.
  • About 1865 Alexena came to Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.[25]
  • On the 1865 Illinois State Census there is a William Sexton living in Ottawa LaSalle, Illinois.[26] The name right above William’s on the census is Octavius Hanbury.[27]
  • In 1866 James Sexton is born to Catherine and William Sexton in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.[28]
  • 1922 Catherine dies in Michigan[29] and there is no mention of a sister Alexena in her obituary.[30]
  • In 1924 Alexena dies in Ottawa, Illinois and there is no mention of a sister Catherine in her obituary.[31]
  • Searched for William Frazer born in 1844 living in or near Ottawa, Illinois, but ran in to dead end.

It looks like Alexena and Catherine are connected and were in Ottawa at the same time 1865 – 1866 and there is a connection through the DNA.  I’m still looking for the paper proof as to Alexena’s parentage, and won’t be satisfied until I find one.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________

[1] Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Census Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1031. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1861 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009

[2] “Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS7D-BSCW-9?cc=2568642&wc=Q866-ZZM%3A1589652495%2C1589662401 : 31 March 2017), Halton > 1858-1872, vol 17 > image 18 of 142; citing The Archives of Ontario, Toronto.

[3] https://www.ancestry.com/dna/tests/1ADD5078-94BD-4B17-A951-DDB617F14633/match/E6FD5653-A7D2-4460-8B9A-2E7359096141

[4] Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2CB-WYPH : (31 March 2017), Wm Sexton and Catharine Fraser, 06 Jan 1862; citing Elgin, Rideau Lakes, Leeds and Grenville, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 1,030,055.

[5] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Death records, 1867 – 1950 [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA:  Ancestry Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data:  Death Records, Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.

[6] Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2CB-WYPH : (31 March 2017), Wm Sexton and Catharine Fraser, 06 Jan 1862; citing Elgin, Rideau Lakes, Leeds and Grenville, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 1,030,055.

[7] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Death Records, 1867-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry  Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data:  Death Records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.

[8] Year: 1880; Census Place: Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan; Roll: 599; Family History Film: 1254599; Page: 320D; Enumeration District: 266.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[9] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Death Records, 1867-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data:  Death Records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.

[10] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data: Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867–1952. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics.

[11] Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois, Daily Republican Times, Monday Evening, March 8, 1926 Vol XLIX no. 208, Page 1, Front Page.

[12] Year: 1860; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Roll: M653_196; Page: 509; Family History Library Film: 803196.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[13] Illinois State Archives; Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Census, 1865; Archive Collection Number: 103.010; Roll Number: 2179; Line: 24

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. Illinois, State Census Collection, 1825-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.

[14] Ibid.

[15] Ibid

[16] Ibid.

[17] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registration Records (Provost Marshal General’s Bureau; Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865); Record Group: 110, Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War); Collection Name: Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865 (Civil War Union Draft Records); NAI: 4213514; Archive Volume Number: 1 of 5. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

[18] Ibid.

[19] Daily Republican Times, (Ottawa, Illinois), Monday Evening, 8 March 1926, Front Page.

[20] State of Illinois, Department of Public Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Springfield, Illinois, Certificate of Death, Registration no. 37.

[21] Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2CB-WYPH : (31 March 2017), Wm Sexton and Catharine Fraser, 06 Jan 1862; citing Elgin, Rideau Lakes, Leeds and Grenville, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 1,030,055.

[22] Year: 1860; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Roll: M653_196; Page: 509; Family History Library Film: 803196.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[23] Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2CB-WYPH : (31 March 2017), Wm Sexton and Catharine Fraser, 06 Jan 1862; citing Elgin, Rideau Lakes, Leeds and Grenville, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 1,030,055.

[24] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registration Records (Provost Marshal General’s Bureau; Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865); Record Group: 110, Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War); Collection Name: Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865 (Civil War Union Draft Records); NAI: 4213514; Archive Volume Number: 1 of 5. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

[25] Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois, Daily Republican Times, Monday Evening, March 8, 1926 Vol XLIX no. 208, Page 1, Front Page.

[26] Illinois State Archives; Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Census, 1865; Archive Collection Number: 103.010; Roll Number: 2179; Line: 24

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. Illinois, State Census Collection, 1825-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2008.

[27] Ibid.

[28] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data: Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867–1952. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics.

[29] Ancestry.com. Michigan, Death Records, 1867-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.  Original data:  Death Records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.

[30] Flint, Michigan, Flint Journal, 1922- 09 -05, page 8.  Genealogy Bank

[31] Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois, Daily Republican Times, Monday Evening, March 8, 1926 Vol XLIX no. 208, Page 1, Front Page

Remembering Susie at Christmas Time

susie-and-santa-2

Susie and Santa

In late November of 1992 we brought, Susie, our six weeks old Golden Retriever home.  She was so little and smaller than our rabbit.  There were two females in the litter, and since we had a hard time making a choice between them, I bought them both.  We kept the runt of the litter and gave the other one to my brother for a Christmas present.   As puppies, Susie and Brittney (my brother’s puppy) would play and wrestle around until we were worn out watching them.  Susie was smaller than Brittney and would get her head under Brittney and then take a little nip.  Susie grew fast and as she got bigger the faster she could run.  We started out leaving her loose in the yard and showing her where the yard ended.  But she would have none of that, and her long legs carried her right out of the yard.  The more we chased after her, the more she would run.  We even got one of those invisible electric fences, but that didn’t stop her, she would yip as she went through it and keep going.  We finally got a 30 foot leash and would chain her outside.  The 30 foot diameter she had out in our yard became her domain.  The grass grew better out in that area evidently from her fertilizer.  The chipmunks knew not to dig their holes in her area and stayed just outside her domain.  She loved to bark and barked at everything in sight.  We believe that she heard her echo and thought it was another dog.  She could spot a squirrel a long way off.  When someone would go out the door, she knew where to stand and how to time it so that when the door opened out she would bolt.  She thought she should sleep in bed with us.  She watched TV with us and I mean she really watched TV.  She would sit in front of it and watch it with her head moving back and forth with the action.  One Christmas we bought a video camera, and we taped our family Christmas.  After my brother left with Brittney, I put on the tape of our Christmas to watch.  Susie heard my brother’s voice and ran to the TV.   She watched him move across the screen and out of sight, but could still hear his voice.  She ran around the room looking for him including looking behind the TV.  She was our constant companion, and we would take her on camping trips and for long walks in the woods.

When Susie was around 13 years old she started having trouble with her back legs and hips.  We had to help her in and out of the car.  Sometimes she had a hard time standing up on a tile floor, and we would have to help her.  Even a couple of stairs became difficult for her to navigate.  She still went camping and we would lift into the car and in and out of the trailer.

On March 22, 2008 Susie hips and legs gave out for the last time, and she could not get up even with our help.  We knew that the time had come for us to make that very difficult decision. We took her to the vets for the final time. When they had her ready, we went into the examining room.  They brought her in on the stretcher and placed it on the floor.  We got down on the floor and talked to her and pet her.  She did not attempt to get up or move.  She just seemed resigned that this was the end.  After a few minutes, we told the vet we were ready and she gave her the shot.  She went very peacefully.  She put her head down on her front paw and she was gone. There is no doubt that Susie was loved, loved so much that we would do anything to keep her alive.  I think she had a good life and lived longer than most Golden Retrievers.  When a pet is in your life for 15 years they become a big part of the family and leave a big void when they are gone. I will never forget her and there will always be a very special place in my heart for her.  A week after she died, we picked up her ashes.  I cried in the car on the way home and held the box containing the ashes close to my heart.  It felt like we were bringing Susie home again.  We were going to bury her ashes in the back yard.  But we changed our minds and put her on our fireplace mantel.  It’s comforting to know she is there.  I hope where ever she is that she knows how much she was loved and how much she is missed.  Maybe someday we shall meet again.

Note:  Brittney died about two years before Susie.  I was with her at the end too. I loved Brittney and she holds a special place in my heart too.  I hope to meet her again someday too.

Copyright © 2017 Gail Grunst

John Conrad Reinhardt

John C. Reinhardt

In December 1879 four month old John Conrad Reinhardt landed in New York from Germany aboard the ship Bergenland  with his parents and older sister Eva.[1]  From New York John and family traveled to Amana, Iowa, and settled in South Amana.[2]  John was born in Baden, Germany on 10 August 1879[3] to Conrad John Reinhardt and Anna Marie Schwebler.[4]  They lived in South Amana from December 1879 to April 1883.[5]  At this time it is unknown where the family lived between 1883 and 1885 when they settled in Ottawa, Illinois.   John grew up in Ottawa, Illinois, the son of a shoemaker,[6]  where he was confirmed and became a member of the German Church of Illinois now the United Church of Christ.[7]  I don’t know when he left Ottawa to strike out on his own, however in 1910, John lived alone on a farm in Salamanca, Cherokee, Kansas.[8]  According to his marriage license in 1912 he lived Columbus, Cherokee, Kansas[9] which is the nearest city to Salamanca Township, and only about 30 miles from Carthage, Missouri[10] where he married Nina Lynn of Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri on 10 July 1912.[11]  Nina was 16 years his junior.[12]  After they were married they lived in Canada for a year and then settled in Sabetha, Nehama, Kansas.[13]  When John first came to Sabetha he was employed by Ernest Meeh, who owned a meat market.[14] After the World War I, Mr. Meeh returned to New York, and John bought the meat market from him.[15]  John and Nina had five children, Eugene born in 1913,[16] followed by Alice in 1915,[17] John Julius in 1917,[18] Ada in 1919[19] and Mark in 1921.[20] In February 1942 John became seriously ill and spent a week in a coma before passing away on the 24th.[21]  For three years prior to his death, he suffered from two strokes and was in poor health.[22]  Nina lived for 48 years after John’s death.[23]  Nina passed away on 24 May 1990 and is buried in the Sabetha Cemetery[24] along with her husband John.[25] 

In case the note above is not readable, there is a transcription below.

 reinhardt Meat Market

August 15, 1930

Dear Sister Liz and Tim,

Your birthday greeting received.  Maybe but only maybe I might drive up there for a day or 2.

John

Had some rains here corn looking fairly good.

Liz was John sister Elizabeth Reinhardt Farrell and Tim was her husband.

Copyright© 2017 Gail Grunst

______________________________________________________________ 

[1] Germans to America(Vol. 34). (1993). Wilmington, DE, DE: Scholarly Resources.

[2] Amana Church Membership Records, in archive collection of the Amana Heritage Museum, Amana, Iowa

[3] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday February 25, 1942.  John Reinhardt Obituary.

[4] Year: 1880; Census Place: Amana, Iowa, Iowa; Roll: 345; Family History Film: 1254345; Page: 146D; Enumeration District: 201

[5] August Koch manuscript, Archives Collection, Amana Heritage Museum, Amana, Iowa.

[6] Year: 1880; Census Place: Amana, Iowa, Iowa; Roll: 345; Family History Film: 1254345; Page: 146D; Enumeration District: 201

[7] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday February 25, 1942.  John Conrad Reinhardt Obituary.

[8] Year: 1910; Census Place: Salamanca, Cherokee, Kansas; Roll T624 434; page: 1A; Enumeration District: 0039 FHL microfilm:  1374447.   Ancestry.Com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2006.

[9] Ancestry.com. Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2007.  Original data:  Missouri Marriage Records, Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives.

[10] Mapquest.com https://www.mapquest.com/directions/list/1/us/ks/columbus-282022909/to/us/mo/sarcoxie

[11] Ancestry.com. Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2007.  Original data:  Missouri Marriage Records, Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives.

[12] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday, May 30 1990, page 7.  Nina Reinhardt Obituary.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday February 25, 1942.  John Reinhardt Obituary

[15] Ibid.

[16] Year: 1920; Census Place: Sabetha, Nemaha, Kansas; Roll: T625_540; Page: 11B; Enumeration District: 134.  Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Ibid.

[19] Ibid.

[20] Year: 1930; Census Place: Sabetha, Nemaha, Kansas; Roll: 713; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0023; FHL microfilm: 2340448

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

[21] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday February 25, 1942.  John Reinhardt Obituary

[22] Ibid.

[23] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday, May 30 1990, page 7.  Nina Reinhardt Obituary.

[24] Ibid

[25] Kansas, Sabetha, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday February 25, 1942.  John Reinhardt Obituary