A Woman of Size and Strength

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is Random Fact.  

Elizabeth Schuh grave

While I was researching a great-great uncle, John C. Reinhardt, I found an article in the Sabetha Herald about John’s recollection of his childhood in the Amana Colonies in Iowa.[1]  I found this interesting since he is my great grandmother’s brother and our common ancestor is his father (my great-great grandfather).  In the article John mentions that his great-aunt was a school teacher for more than half a century.  She weighed 225 pounds and was 6 feet 2 inches (random fact). The name of the great aunt was not mentioned in the article.  I figured this was my great-great-grandfather’s connection to Amana, and this is one of the reasons he probably chose to go there upon arriving in the US.  I had corresponded with the Amana Heritage Society previously when needing information on my great-great-grandfather.  I wrote to them once again and they were able to provide with information about the aunt. 

Here is their answer to my inquiry.

“We took some time to peruse the Inspirations=Historie, The Anderson Cards, the Koch Verzeichnis, and another resource and came up with the following information:

The Aunt was Elizabetha Schuh born in Nussloch near Heidelberg, Baden, 26 May 1831.  She came to Ebenezer Society in September 1847, then to Amana in October 1863.  Died in Amana 25 May 1908.  Our Internal records of Amana Society indicate that she came with the Bortz family with the intention of going to live at Galion, OH.  I make the assumption, that because they were all from the Heidelberg area, and that’s where the Rappites had their stronghold before founding the communal society at Zoar, they were familiar with both us and them.  The Bortz Family another outside source claims that her parents did not approve of her relationship with a certain boy so they shipped her to America.  We cannot corroborate this fact, but she did come with another family and not hers.

To her physical size, the Inspirations=historie call her a ‘person of size and strength’ so her exact measurements are not documented.  The histories do not give her occupation in Ebenezer or Amana.  All communal-era teachers were men.  The excepton was the knitting school was usually taught by women.  So this could have been her job.  As I mentioned, her occupation is not documented.”

Amana Heritage Society[2]

I was able to find her on the 1870 United States Federal Census[3] and the 1885 Iowa Census[4] and on both census records her occupation is listed as housekeeper not a teacher.  I also found her the ship passenger list.  She departed from Le Harve, France and arrived at the Port of New York on 9 September 1847 on the ship Harve.[5] Above her name on the passenger list are the names of the Bortz Family, Adam (57), Margaret (47), Catherine (22), Susanna (19), Elizabeth (17), Philippina (12).[6]  It is interesting that they have a daughter named Elizabeth about the same age as Elizabeth Schuh.  I also noticed the names Susanna and Philippina are also names used in the Schuh family.  Now I wonder what the Bortz family connection is to the Schuh’s, or were they just friends.? This is why genealogy never ends.   I also found her grave on find-a-grave (see above). [7] 

I now have all these questions.  How did Elizabeth feel about being sent away to a new country without her family at just 16 years old?  Did she see her family of origin ever again?  What was so awful about the boy she was seeing that she needed to be sent so far away? 

Elizabeth never married and I wonder if she had a happy life. 

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

________________________________________________________________________________

[1] Sabetha, Kansas, Sabetha Herald, Wednesday, December 9, 1936, Pg. 4.

[2] Email from the Amana Heritage Society to Gail Grunst dated Friday October 13, 2017.

[3] Year: 1870; Census Place: Amana, Iowa, Iowa; Roll: M593_396; Page: 131B; Family History Library Film: 545895

[4] Ancestry.com. Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007.

[5] Year: 1847; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 069; Line: 15; List Number: 677

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

 

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Bearded

2 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is Bearded.  “There’s been a fad the past few years of “No Shave November” or “Novembeard” – making this the perfect time to feature ancestors with a beard. The popularity of facial hair has waxed and waned over the decades, but the last half of the 19th century and early 20th century saw men sporting all kinds of beards and mustaches. Find a photo of someone in your family tree with a great beard and share his story.”

 

Charles Bowers

Charles Bowers

Charles was born in 1828 in Terrington-St Clements, Norfolk, England to Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford.[1]  Charles’ mother died when he was just a little over two years old.[2]  Charles grew up in England with his father and brothers.  One wonders if Bonnet had help with the care of the children.  There were aunts and uncles living in Terrington-St. Clements perhaps they helped.

Charles left England when he was just 21 years old. He left Liverpool, England on February 1, 1851 with his father Bonnet Bowers aboard the sailing ship Conqueror of New York.[3]   If Charles had friends or family already in the United States they might have paid for his passage.  If his passage was not previously paid he would have to pay his passage and make the best bargain he could with the passenger-brokers.  The competition in this trade was very great, and fares varied from day-to-day, and even from hour to hour, sometimes as high as 5 pounds per passenger in the steerage and sometimes as low as 3 pounds 10 shillings.[4]

Charles’ experience immigrating to the United States was probably much like the following description of the typical emigrants experience leaving England through Liverpool.  “Notices were placed though out Liverpool with dates of sailing.  Most of the ships were owned and operated out of New York.   The average number of steerage passengers accommodated by most ships at that time was 400, but some had room for double that amount.  After the emigrant had chosen the ship that he would sail on, he had to bargain with the “man-catchers” a class of persons who received commission from the passenger- brokers for each emigrant they brought to the office of the passenger-broker.

The emigrant’s next duty was to present himself to the medical inspector.  A medical practitioner appointed by the emigration office of the port had to inspect the passengers to check for contagious diseases.  When the emigrant and his family had undergone this process, their passage-ticket was stamped, and they had nothing further to do until it was time to board.

The scene at the Waterloo dock in Liverpool, where all the American sailing ships were stationed was very busy at all times, but on the morning of the departure a large ship full of emigrants was particularly exciting and interesting.  Many of the emigrants boarded twenty-four hours before departure bringing quantities of provisions, although the government supplied the emigrants with liberal provisions to keep them in good health and comfort.

The following is the list of provisions provided by the government per week.

2 and ½ lbs of bread or biscuit

1 lb wheaten flour

5 lbs oatmeal

2 lbs rice

2 oz tea

½ lb sugar

½ lb molasses

3 quarts of water daily

On the day before sailing and during the time that a ship may be unavoidable detained in dock, some of the immigrants played the violin or bagpipes for their fellow passengers.   Young and old alike would dance and party.

A large number of spectators were at the dock-gates to witness the final departure of the ship full with anxious immigrants.  As the ship was towed out hats were raised, handkerchiefs waved, and people shouted their farewells from shore and the emigrants waved back from the ship.  It was at this moment emigrants realized this would be their last look at the old country.   A country in all probability associated with sorrow and suffering, of semi-starvation, never-the-less it was a country of their fathers, the country of their childhood, however little time was left to indulge in these reflections.

The ship was generally towed by a steam tug five or ten miles down the Mersey.  During this time the search for stowaways is done and a roll-call of passengers.  All passengers except those in state cabins were assembled on the quarter-deck.  The clerk of the passenger-broker, accompanied by the ship’s surgeon called for tickets.  A double purpose was answered by the roll-call, the verification of the passenger-list, and the medical inspection of the emigrants, on behalf of the captain and owners.  The previous inspection on the part of the governor was to prevent the risk of contagious disease on board.  The inspection on the part of the owners is for a different purpose.  The ship had to pay a poll tax of $1.50 per passenger to the State of New York; and if any of the poor emigrants were helpless and deformed, the owners were fined in the sum of $75.00 for bringing them and were compelled to enter in a bond to New York City so that they did not become a burden on the public.  The emigrants then settle in for the long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.[5] After almost 3 month of sailing across the ocean, Charles arrived at the Port of New York on April 21, 1851.[6]  Before 1855 there was no immigrant processing center.  The shipping company presented a passenger list to the Collector of Customs, and the immigrants made whatever customs declaration was necessary and went on their way.’[7]

Charles’ brother, Robert and his wife, Rhoda, followed to the United States in November 1851 aboard the ship Emma Field.[8] Robert, his wife, and Bonnet settled in Syracuse, New York[9].  At this time, I cannot find when Charles’ brother, Richard, came to the United States, however he is found living in Syracuse, New York in 1870[10]

In 1855, just one year after Charles arrived in Ottawa, it became a chartered city.   “Ottawa, Illinois is situated at the junction of the Fox and Illinois rivers, nearly the geographical center of LaSalle County.  The Fox enters the Illinois from the northeast and with its rapid currents feeds the Chicago and Illinois Canal, which follows the banks of the Illinois River.  In 1854 Ottawa had about 4,000 to 6,000 inhabitants.  The bridge over the Illinois River was under constriction connecting South Ottawa with the main city on the North.  Ottawa was and still is the LaSalle County seat.  In 1854 Ottawa had a mill on the Illinois River that turned out 100 barrels of flour per day.  Ottawa also had a foundry, two large machine shops, and other large manufacturers.” [11]

The same year(1854) that Charles came to Ottawa, he applied to become a United States Citizen in the LaSalle County Circuit Court. 12]   I often wondered what brought Charles to Ottawa, Illinois when it appears that his brothers and father stayed in New York.  I recently found that his step-brother William Linfor(d) was living in Ottawa, Illinois in 1854.[13]  You can read my post “Finding Brother William” published November 24, 2012 on this blog.  I assume that Charles came to Ottawa because he knew William Linfor.                      

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

On August 21, 1858 the first Lincoln-Douglas debate took place in Ottawa at the stand in Washington Park.[14]  I wonder if Charles attended and what his thoughts were about the two men.  He was not yet a United States citizen so he could not vote.  He became a naturalized citizen of the United States in January 1859.  He signed his naturalization papers with an X indicating he could not write.[15]

In 1860 Charles is found living in Lisbon, Kendall County, Illinois working on a farm and living with a family by the name of Leach.[16]  Charles bought a house In 1868 on the corner of Chapel and York Streets (543 Chapel Street) in Ottawa, Illinois for $1,000 cash from William K and Ellen M. Stewart of Ottawa, Illinois.  The house sits on a high bluff across the street from the Fox River.  It is located in a rather well-to-do area of Ottawa surrounded by Victorian houses.  Charles’ house is rather modest compared to houses around it.[17]  The house had living room, dining room, kitchen, parlor, storage room, and one bedroom on first floor.  The second floor had four bedrooms and bath (bath may have been added later).[18]

In December 1868 Charles married Alexena Frazer.[19]  They had five children Richard, Elizabeth, Robert, Genevieve, and Ethelyn.[20]   There may have been two children who died as infants.  According to Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records there is an E. E. and a J.A. Bowers buried in grave one.[21]

Charles worked as a janitor for the East Ottawa Public School.[22]  He and Alexena lived at 543 Chapel Street in Ottawa.[23]  He was a member of the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows for over 30 years.  He was a kind-hearted man, patient with children and liked by everyone.[24]  Charles died in 1897 and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, in Ottawa, Illinois.[25

Bowers' Family Headstone

Bowers’ Family Headstone

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst                        


[1]Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3]Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[4] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[5] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[6] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[8] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm serial M237; Microfilm roll: M237-107; Line: 26; List number 1664.  Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line].  Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006 Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington D.C.

[9] Year: 1860, Census Place: Onondaga, Onondaga, New York, Roll: M653_829, Page 579; Image: 367. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA. The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860.  Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1438 rolls.

[10]Year: 1870 Census Place: Syracuse Ward 7, Onondaga, New York; Roll M593_1063; Page: 464; Image: 239. Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870 United States Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington D. C. National Archives and Records Administration, M593, RG29. 1761 rolls.

[11] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 39.

[12] Declaration of Intent (naturalization) for Charles Bowers, LaSalle County, Illinois,  Circuit Court, LaSalle County, Illinois Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois; Book 2, Pg. 227.

[13]  (Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227. 

[14] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 45.

[15] Final naturalization record for Charles Bowers.  LaSalle County Illinois, Circuit Court LaSalle County, Illinois  Court House, Ottawa, Illinois; Book E, Pg. 85.

[16] Ancestry.com 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA:  The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Eight Census of the United States, 1860, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration 1860, M653.               

[17] Author’s personal view of the house after visiting the area and seeing the house first hand in July of 2008.

[18] Probate File of Elizabeth A. Bowers Record A-6 page 176.  In possession of the LaSalle County Genealogical Guild, 115 Glover W. Glover, Ottawa, Illinois.

[19] Marriage License and certificate for Charles Bowers and Alexena Frazer.  License issued November 25, 1868, office of the clerk of the county, LaSalleCounty, Ottawa, Illinois.  Marriage date December 2, 1868 by Abraham R. Moore, Minister of the Gospel, filed with the LaSalle Illinois, CountyClerk office, LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois.

[20] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[21] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records; Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois, Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

[22] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[23] Ottawa Illinois City Directories 1866 – 1912.

[24] Obituary for Charles Bowers: Republican Times (Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois) February 18, 1897.

[25] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery Records: Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois. Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

Frightening Stories

werewolf

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is Frightening.  “Any ghost stories in the family? Ever been scared while researching? Been frightened in a cemetery? Or how about sharing a Halloween story or photo? “

We had a relative who passed away a few years ago.  I am leaving out her name to protect the innocent.  She was a wonderful lady and had a heart of gold.  There isn’t anything she wouldn’t do for you.  That said, she told some fantastic tales.  She wasn’t just making them up to entertain us, she truly believed in what she told us.  At one time she was going to write a book about all her experiences. I wish she had written them down because now I can’t remember all the details.  When we visited, our husbands would be in another room watching TV and talking.  I would be in the kitchen with her, and my kids would be playing in the next room.  Unfortunately, they could hear her and on the way home I had to explain that she was just making it up to try to ease their minds.  Some of the tales were frightening and others just unbelievable.  I will try to tell some of them the best I can, but they won’t be the same because Iike I said I don’t remember the all the details.

She claimed that she heard voices coming from upstairs, but no one was home.  She decided to go up there and see where the voices were coming from.  When she started up the stairs the end table next to the stairs said. “Do not to go up there.”  So she stopped, waited a few seconds and tried again.  Once again the end table said to her, “Do not to go up there.”  She became frightened, stopped, and didn’t go up there.  She became convinced that end table was possessed.  A couple of days later she decided to get rid of the end table and asked her son to take it to some antique store.  On his way, he was in an accident and she believed that the table caused the accident.  The fact that her son was in always getting in accidents was beside the point. 

She claimed that she grew a third breast, right between the other two.  She diagnosed herself with Breast Cancer, and sent her son to Mexico to buy some Laetrile for her.  She took the Laetrile until she ran out, and she had to send her son back to Mexico several more times for more Laetrile. After about a year of taking Laetrile, the third breast finally disappeared.  It never returned, and she claimed the Laetrile cured her of Breast Cancer.  She just couldn’t understand why the United States didn’t make it available to cure all Cancers. 

One night she woke up to a bright light that lit up the bedroom.  She tried to wake up her husband, but he told her that she was crazy and went back to sleep.  She got up and went into another room to look out the window.  Her daughter was already there looking out the window, when they both saw a UFO land in their yard.  All of sudden it took off and disappeared.  The next day she told her husband that both she and her daughter saw it, but he would not believe her. 

She said that when she was a child her father had been very sick for a long time and was lying on the sofa, when all of sudden he started to levitate off the sofa.  He hovered there for a few minutes before finally settling back down on sofa.  They tried to talk to him while he was levitating, but he seemed to be in a trance.  Afterwards he was cured of whatever ailed him.

Another time when she was a child, she said, she was walking down the street in the dark, and saw a man coming toward her when he turned into a werewolf.  It was a country road in a wooded area and after turning into a werewolf, he turned and headed into the woods.

There were many more stories, but these are the only ones that I can remember.   She sure made an impression on all of us.  My kids, all grown-up now for many years, still talk about her stories. 

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

 

Causes of Death

Eliza Bower's Tombstone

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is Cause of Death. “Death is one of the certainties of life. Let’s explore causes of death this week. Do you have a relative who died in an unusual way? Perhaps you’ve found an unusual record that shows the cause of death. (One that comes to mind is a tombstone in a nearby cemetery that states that the deceased died of consumption. You don’t usually find a cause of death on a tombstone.)”

The one unusual cause of death I found was stab wounds to the chest.  I have already written about my ancestor who was killed by his neighbor so I didn’t want to do that again.  The rest of the causes of death were mostly ordinary.  I did a spread sheet of the causes of death and I did find a pattern in some illnesses among my ancestors.  There seemed to be a lot of Cancer among my ancestors. There were a couple of cases of lung cancer, along with prostate, bladder, pancreas, and  gallbladder cancer.  I also found several cases of Nephritis.  My father always said kidney problems ran in the his family. One ancestors died in the flu epidemic of 1918 -19.  Another one died young of Appendicitis.  She was operated on in 1898 but still ended up passing away.  I can’t help but wonder if today’s medicine would have saved either one. Below I listed all the causes of death among my ancestors that I could find along with a definition of them.  

 

Acidosis and dehydration  — an excessively acid condition of the body fluids or tissues and body does not have enough fluids
Acute Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura  —  is a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. Platelets are cells in the blood that help stop bleeding. A decrease in platelets can result in easy bruising, bleeding gums and internal bleeding.
Appendicitis — is a medical emergency that almost always requires prompt surgery to remove the appendix. Left untreated, an inflamed appendix will eventually burst, or perforate, spilling infectious materials into the abdominal cavity.
Carcinoma of Gallbladder — Your gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ on the right side of your abdomen, just beneath your liver. The gallbladder stores bile, a digestive fluid produced by your liver. Gallbladder cancer is uncommon. … But most gallbladder cancers are discovered at a late stage, when the prognosis is often very poor.
Carcinoma of the Pancreas metastases to liver and bone — is a disease in which malignant (cancerous) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach and in front of the spine. The pancreas produces digestive juices and hormones that regulate blood sugar. Carcinoma of the pancreas can often first spread within the abdomen (belly) and to the liver. They can also spread to the lungs, bone, brain, and other organs.
Carcinoma of the Prostate and Urinary Bladder — Prostate cancer, an adenocarcinoma, is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among men, as well as the most common solid tumor in men, overall. The most common areas for prostate cancer to spread are your bladder, rectum, and bones. It can also spread to your lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and other body tissues.
Carcinoma Pulmonary and metastases to ribs, liver, and bone  —  Metastatic lung cancer may spread to the bones, brain, or liver. … of the liver may be sickness, reduced appetite, and pain under the right ribs.
Cerebral Hemorrhage and Paralysis — Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is when blood suddenly bursts into brain tissue, causing damage to your brain. Symptoms usually appear suddenly during ICH. They include headache, weakness, confusion, and paralysis, particularly on one side of your body. … This can quickly cause brain and nerve damage.
Chronic Gastroenteritis — Gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach lining. Weaknesses or injury to the mucus-lined barrier that protects your stomach wall allows your digestive juices to damage and inflame your stomach lining. A number of diseases and conditions can increase your risk of gastritis, including Crohn’s disease and sarcoidosis, a condition in which collections of inflammatory cells grow in the body.
Chronic Interstitial Nephritis and Hypertension — Left untreated, gastritis may lead to stomach ulcers and stomach bleeding. Rarely, some forms of chronic gastritis may increase your risk of stomach cancer, especially if you have extensive thinning of the stomach lining and changes in the lining’s cells
Chronic Myocarditis and Arteriosclerosis Myocarditis is a disease marked by inflammation and damage of the heart muscle. … There are many causes of myocarditis, including viral infections, autoimmune diseases, environmental toxins, and adverse reactions to medications. The prognosis is variable but chronic heart failure is the major long term complication.  Arteriosclerosis is the thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries, occurring typically in old age.
Chronic Parenchymatous Nephritis —  is ordinarily applied to a variety of renal diseases which pathologically may be widely different in character. Thus cases of chronic diffuse nephritis, of amyloid kidney and of chronic nephrosis are grouped under a single heading.
Eclampsia and Pregnancy — Eclampsia is a severe complication of preeclampsia. It’s a rare but serious condition where high blood pressure results in seizures during pregnancy. Seizures are periods of disturbed brain activity that can cause episodes of staring, decreased alertness, and convulsions (violent shaking). Eclampsia affects about 1 in every 200 women with preeclampsia. You can develop eclampsia even if you don’t have a history of seizures.
Influenza, Bronchial Pneumonia  — Influenza is a common cause of pneumonia, especially among younger children, the elderly, pregnant women, or those with certain chronic health conditions or who live in a nursing home. Most cases of flu never lead to pneumonia, but those that do tend to be more severe and deadly. In fact, flu and pneumonia were the eighth leading cause of death in the United States in 2015.
Myocarditis and Chronic Interstitial Nephritis  — Myocarditis is a disease marked by inflammation and damage of the heart muscle. … There are many causes of myocarditis, including viral infections, autoimmune diseases, environmental toxins, and adverse reactions to medications. The prognosis is variable but chronic heart failure is the major long term complication.  Interstitial nephritis is a form of nephritis affecting the interstitium of the kidneys surrounding the tubules, i.e., is inflammation of the spaces between renal tubules. This disease can be either acute, meaning it occurs suddenly, or chronic, meaning it is ongoing and eventually ends in kidney failure.
Pulmonary Edema, Coronary thrombosis, Heart Disease  — Pulmonary edema is a condition caused by excess fluid in the lungs. This fluid collects in the numerous air sacs in the lungs, making it difficult to breathe. In most cases, heart problems cause pulmonary edema.  Coronary thrombosis a blockage of the flow of blood to the heart, caused by a blood clot in a coronary artery.
*Pulmonary Tuberculosis — is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis). … This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person to someone else. You can get TB by breathing in air droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person. The resulting lung infection is called primary.
* Two ancestors died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis
Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung  — Squamous cell lung cancer, or squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, is one type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is also called epidermoid carcinoma. This type of lung cancer begins in the squamous cells—thin, flat cells that look like fish scales when seen under a microscope.
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage increased intracranial pressure — Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening type of stroke caused by bleeding into the space surrounding the brain. SAH can be caused by a ruptured aneurysm, AVM, or head injury. One-third of patients will survive with good recovery; one-third will survive with a disability; and one-third will die.
Uremia and Chronic interstitial nephritisUremia is a serious condition and, if untreated, can be life-threateningUremia is a major symptom of renal failure. Uremia is also a sign of the last stages of chronic kidney disease.  Interstitial nephritis is a form of nephritis affecting the interstitium of the kidneys surrounding the tubules, i.e., is inflammation of the spaces between renal tubules. This disease can be either acute, meaning it occurs suddenly, or chronic, meaning it is ongoing and eventually ends in kidney failure

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

Conflict?

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks  topic is Conflict.

In my 2nd great-grandfather, John Desens, probate file, I found what might be a conflict.  It looks like John’s son-in-law, Albert Triebes, put in a claim for $75.00 for attending to the burial of John Desens and traveling from Forest Park, Illinois to Greenwood, Wisconsin and back.  His claimed was denied. [1]

john desens estae

Albert Triebes then wrote a letter to the administrator.  Here is a transcript of that letter.

Forest Park, Ill

July 17 – 08

Dear Sir,

I have rec’d your registered letters.  You say my claim is not legal, and the heirs do not want to allow me for the claim.  Let the court decide it.  Even if it will be an additional expense, I do not like to see them have their own way.  For my part they can keep it all.

Yours Resp,

Alb. Trebes

91 Marengo St.

Forest Park, Ill [2]

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It sounds to me like there was a little conflict here.  My father never mentioned his cousins from this side of his family.  I heard the name Triebes and that they were somehow related to my father’s family, but nobody seemed to know how they were related.  My Godfather, Lou Schultz, gave me a lot of information on my father’s family too, and he never mentioned them either.  This happened many years before my father or Lou were born so they may never have met any of them or even been told about this side of the family.  So it is very likely there was some conflict here.

Why was John’s son-in-law taking care of the burial and not his son, Carl, my great-grandfather?  Maybe there was conflict between Carl and his father John.

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[1] Author: Wisconsin. County Court (Clark County); Probate Place: Clark, Wisconsin. Source Information:  Ancestry.com. Wisconsin, Wills and Probate Records, 1800-1987 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2015.Original data: Wisconsin County, District and Probate Courts.

[2] Ibid.

Cubs Win 2016 World Series!!!

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks  topic this week is sports.  Any athletes in the family tree? How about any big sports fans? This is the week to write about them! 

Two years ago I wrote this post.  I am being lazy this week and posting it again instead of trying to come up with some thing new.  Too bad they haven’t been able to do it again!  Wait until next year!

Wow, the Cubs won the World Series after 108 years.  The Cubs are in my DNA.  My grandfather and father were life-long Cub fans.  I inherited their love for the Cubs, and I am also a life-long Cub fan.  My father watched the Cubs or listened to them on radio every chance he got.  When I was growing up they played mostly afternoon games.  He would get home from work around 3 pm and turn on the Cubs.  He took me to my first Cub game when I was five years old.  I don’t remember much about it and didn’t understand the game.  I was only interested in the vendors.  But as I got a little older that all changed.  He taught me all about the game.  He also taught me how to throw, catch, and bat a baseball.  Back when I was young there was no organized baseball for girls.  So I only played in neighborhood games and at school.  But it helped me to learn the game.  I would go to my grandparent’s house, and grandpa would have the game on too.  Needless to say I grew up with the Cubs.  I was just coming of age in 1969 when the Cubs were in first place most of the season, but blew it and ended up in second place.  I went to a game once a week when they were in town.  My brother and I would stand outside Wrigley after the game by the door the players came out of and walk across the street to their cars.  We would get autographs and take pictures.  We even made a trip to St. Louis to watch them play the Cardinals.  We stayed in the same hotel and got to meet some of the players in the lobby of the hotel.  We rode a bus from the hotel to the ball park with some of the player’s families.   A couple of years later I got married and started a family.  I could no longer go every week to a Cub game, but we did go a few times a year.  I have two boys and they grew up with baseball in their blood too.  They went to the rally yesterday and took my grandson.  When they won the pennant, I cried that they finally made it into the World Series, and when they won the World Series, I cried again.  I thought of all the years my father never got to see this.  He did see them go to the World Series in 1945 but never win one.  My grandfather would have been 12 in 1908. I don’t know if he was a Cub fan at 12 or if he got to see them play in the World Series since there was no TV or radio.  But what really broke my heart was that my brother never got to see it.  He lived and died and he never saw them win a Pennant or World Series.  I can picture all three of them cheering for the Cubs from heaven.  I want to be able to share this with them and hear them cheer and shout with joy.  I’m thrilled that the Cubs finally did it and there is no more waiting till next year.  Too bad it took 108 years and so many fans like my grandfather, father and brother never got to see it.  Go Cubs Go, see you next year!

Randy Hundley, Cubs Catcher  1969

randy-hundley

Copyright © 2016 Gail Grunst

#10 Carl Desens

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks topic this week is 10 — “Ten.” Ten what? Someone who had 10 children? Someone with 10 letters in their name? Someone who was in the 10th Infantry? Someone who was born in October? #10 on your ancestor chart? (That would be your paternal grandmother’s father, if you number it the standard way.) How are you going to interpret this week’s theme?

I chose my great-grandfather, Carl Desens, number 10 on my ancestor chart.

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Carl Desens was born on the 14 December 1859 in Berlin, Germany to Johann Desens and Henrietta Gressier.[1] Carl married Augusta Gabbei [2] around 1882 in Germany. [3]  Augusta was born 28 January 1859 in Berlin, Germany.[4]  They had a total of eight children.[5]  The oldest Emma born around 1884 followed by Bertha and Mina all born in Germany.  Children Louise, William, Henry, Anna, and Helen were all born in Illinois, USA.[6]  Carl and Augusta arrived in the United States on April 28, 1888 in Baltimore, Maryland aboard the ship Main along with their daughters, Emma, Berta and Mina. [7] Carl and Augusta settled in Forest Park, Illinois in 1891.[8]  It is unknown at this time where Carl and Augusta resided between their arrival in 1888 and 1891.  On the 5 April 1895 Carl became a United States naturalized citizen. [9]  Carl worked for Public Service Company as a stationary Fireman.[10]  Carl and Augusta attended St. Paul Lutheran Church and St. John’s Lutheran Church both in Forest Park, Illinois[11]  Carl had a brother, Herman,[12] and sisters, Augusta and Johanna.[13]  Carl died on 8 January 1921 of Uremia and Chronic Interstitial Nephritis.[14]  Augusta died on 7 July 1925 of Chronic Interstitial Nephritis and Hypertension[15]  Both Carl and Augusta are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois.[16]  I have no family stories that were handed down about Carl and Augusta.   I did notice that they both died of Chronic Interstitial Nephritis.[17] [18]  My grandmother, Helen Desens also died of Uremia and Chronic Nephritis.[19]  My father said many times that kidney problems ran in his mother’s family and his mother and all her sister’s died young.   I don’t know if her sisters had the same problem, but it is interesting that her parents died of the same thing.   I did run across a newspaper story about Carl’s father John Desens, who was killed by a neighbor in Clark County, Wisconsin[20].  I wrote a separate story about John since there was so much information about the case.  I also ran across another newspaper article about Herman Desens, Carl’s brother, accidentally shooting himself in the chest.[21]  When I interviewed my dad back in 1979, he said there were some relatives that were killed by Indians in Wisconsin.  I think the family story was changed from one being killed by a neighbor and one shooting himself, to being killed by Indians. .  Unfortunately, my father never told me any other family stories.  He was a young child when both his grandparents died, so he probably didn’t remember them.  It is too bad that family stories for this side of the family seem to have been lost. So far, I have been unable to find information on Carl’s mother Henrietta Gressiers.  I have not found any pictures of Carl, but did find one of Augusta Desens with my dad around 1922 or 1923.

On the 1900 census there is a Dorothea Zoschke living with the Desens.[22]  She is listed as Carl’s mother-in-law which makes her Augusta’s mother.[23]  She is listed on the census as 72 years old and a widow.[24]   Since her last name is different from Augusta’s maiden name, Gabbei, Dorothea must have remarried.  I have been unable to find a marriage for Dorothea.  I did find a Dorothea Gabbei on ship records.  She arrived the 27 May 1890 in the Port of New York aboard the ship Elbe, and according to the ship’s record she is 64 years old in 1890[25] near the same age as Dorothea Zoschke.  I also found that she died on 23 June 1901 of Alltersschwache (decrepit, old age, infirm, senile), and she was buried in Concordia Cemetery, Forest Park, Illinois on June 23, 1901.[26]  I am 90% sure that Dorothea Gabbei on the ships record and Dorothea Zoschke are one and the same.  If they are the same that means Dorothea got married after arriving in the United States.  I hope someday to be able to find the answers about Dorothea.

Copyright © 2018 Gail Grunst

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[1] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Forest Park, Registration Dist. 3104, Registered no. 1050. Health Department Record, City of Chicago.

[2] Marriage license and return.  Illinois, DuPage, Wheaton, Illinois State Board of Health,  County Clerk’s Office

[3] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53A; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.   Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[4] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Oak Park, Registration Dist. 4318, Registered No. 395, County Clerks Record.

[5] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53A; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.   Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ancestry.com.  Baltimore Passenger Lists 1820 – 1948 [database on-line].  Provo, UT. USA:  Generations Network, Inc. 2006.  Original Data:  Baltimore, Maryland. Passenger Lists of Vessels arriving at Baltimore, Maryland , 1821-1891.  Micropublication M255.  RG036 Rolls # 1-50.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[8] Abstracted by Ellen Cannon, 8138 Kostner Ave., Skokie, IL 60076 from the book Forest Park Welcomes you to its 100th Birthday Party, 1856-1956, Pg. 47. McHenry Public Library, Illinois, Cook, 977.3, Local History.

[9] Cook County Circuit Court, Naturalization records 1895 -1896 Vol 58 – 59, LDS roll 1024, 610, R58, Pg 57, April 8, 1895.

[10] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Forest Park, Registration Dist. 3104, Registered no. 1050. Health Department Record, City of Chicago.

[11] St John Lutheran Church, Forest Park, Illinois and St, Paul Lutheran Church Congregational Books.

[12] United Church of Christ East Cemetery Index (formerly German Immanuel & Reformed Church), Warner Township, Clark County, Wisconsin

[13] Probate Case Files, Ca. 1873-1917, and Beginning With File No. 2699, Ca. 1900-1917, 1918 General Probate Index; Author: Wisconsin. County Court (Clark County); Probate Place: Clark, Wisconsin.  Wisconsin Historical Society, Eau Clair, Wisconsin.

[14] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Forest Park, Registration Dist. 3104, Registered no. 1050. Health Department Record, City of Chicago.

[15] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Forest Park, Registration Dist. 3104, Registered no. 1050. Health Department Record, City of Chicago.

[16] Cemetery Records: Woodlawn Cemetery, 7600 West Cermak Road, Forest Park, Illinois.  Woodland Section, Part 4, Lot 711 Graves 4 & 5.

[17] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Forest Park, Registration Dist. 3104, Registered no. 1050. Health Department Record, City of Chicago.

[18] Standard Certificate of Death, State of Illinois, Cook County, Oak Park, Registration Dist. 4318, Registered No. 395, County Clerks Record.

[19] Certificate of Death, Registration Dist. 231, No. # 22743, State of Illinois, County of DuPage, City of Elmhurst, County Clerk’s Office

[20] Marshfield Times, 17 July 1907

[21] Greenwood Gleaner, 25 October 1901. Http://wvls.lib.wi.us/ClarkCounty/ckrj/data/obits3/3.htm

[22] Year: 1900; Census Place: Proviso, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 294; Page: 53A; Enumeration District: 1182; FHL microfilm: 1240294

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.   Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Ibid.

[25] Year: 1890; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 549; Line: 12; List Number: 732

Source Information:  Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: 6256867. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[26] Ancestry.com. U.S., Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, Records, 1875-1940 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. ELCA, Birth, Marriage, Deaths. Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, Chicago, Illinois.