Bowers Family 1757 – 1955 Part 3

Charles Bowers

Charles Bowers

Charles was born in 1828 in Terrington-St Clements, Norfolk, England to Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford.[1]  Charles’ mother died when he was just a little over two years old.[2]  Charles grew up in England with his father and brothers.  One wonders if Bonnet had help with the care of the children.  There were aunts and uncles living in Terrington-St. Clements perhaps they helped.

Charles left England when he was just 21 years old. He left Liverpool, England on February 1, 1851 with his father Bonnet Bowers aboard the sailing ship Conqueror of New York.[3]   If Charles had friends or family already in the United States they might have paid for his passage.  If his passage was not previously paid he would have to pay his passage and make the best bargain he could with the passenger-brokers.  The competition in this trade was very great, and fares varied from day-to-day, and even from hour to hour, sometimes as high as 5 pounds per passenger in the steerage and sometimes as low as 3 pounds 10 shillings.[4]

Charles’ experience immigrating to the United States was probably much like the following description of the typical emigrants experience leaving England through Liverpool.  “Notices were placed though out Liverpool with dates of sailing.  Most of the ships were owned and operated out of New York.   The average number of steerage passengers accommodated by most ships at that time was 400, but some had room for double that amount.  After the emigrant had chosen the ship that he would sail on, he had to bargain with the “man-catchers” a class of persons who received commission from the passenger- brokers for each emigrant they brought to the office of the passenger-broker.

The emigrant’s next duty was to present himself to the medical inspector.  A medical practitioner appointed by the emigration office of the port had to inspect the passengers to check for contagious diseases.  When the emigrant and his family had undergone this process, their passage-ticket was stamped, and they had nothing further to do until it was time to board.

The scene at the Waterloo dock in Liverpool, where all the American sailing ships were stationed was very busy at all times, but on the morning of the departure a large ship full of emigrants was particularly exciting and interesting.  Many of the emigrants boarded twenty-four hours before departure bringing quantities of provisions, although the government supplied the emigrants with liberal provisions to keep them in good health and comfort.

The following is the list of provisions provided by the government per week.

2 and ½ lbs of bread or biscuit

1 lb wheaten flour

5 lbs oatmeal

2 lbs rice

2 oz tea

½ lb sugar

½ lb molasses

3 quarts of water daily

On the day before sailing and during the time that a ship may be unavoidable detained in dock, some of the immigrants played the violin or bagpipes for their fellow passengers.   Young and old alike would dance and party.

A large number of spectators were at the dock-gates to witness the final departure of the ship full with anxious immigrants.  As the ship was towed out hats were raised, handkerchiefs waved, and people shouted their farewells from shore and the emigrants waved back from the ship.  It was at this moment emigrants realized this would be their last look at the old country.   A country in all probability associated with sorrow and suffering, of semi-starvation, never-the-less it was a country of their fathers, the country of their childhood, however little time was left to indulge in these reflections.

The ship was generally towed by a steam tug five or ten miles down the Mersey.  During this time the search for stowaways is done and a roll-call of passengers.  All passengers except those in state cabins were assembled on the quarter-deck.  The clerk of the passenger-broker, accompanied by the ship’s surgeon called for tickets.  A double purpose was answered by the roll-call, the verification of the passenger-list, and the medical inspection of the emigrants, on behalf of the captain and owners.  The previous inspection on the part of the governor was to prevent the risk of contagious disease on board.  The inspection on the part of the owners is for a different purpose.  The ship had to pay a poll tax of $1.50 per passenger to the State of New York; and if any of the poor emigrants were helpless and deformed, the owners were fined in the sum of $75.00 for bringing them and were compelled to enter in a bond to New York City so that they did not become a burden on the public.  The emigrants then settle in for the long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.[5] After almost 3 month of sailing across the ocean, Charles arrived at the Port of New York on April 21, 1851.[6]  Before 1855 there was no immigrant processing center.  The shipping company presented a passenger list to the Collector of Customs, and the immigrants made whatever customs declaration was necessary and went on their way.’[7]

Robert and his wife, Rhoda, followed to the United States in November 1851 aboard the ship Emma Field.[8] Robert, his wife, and Bonnet settled in Syracuse, New York[9].  At this time, I cannot find when Richard came to the United States, however he is found living in Syracuse, New York in 1870[10]

In 1855, just one year after Charles arrived in Ottawa, it became a chartered city.   “Ottawa, Illinois is situated at the junction of the Fox and Illinois rivers, nearly the geographical center of LaSalle County.  The Fox enters the Illinois from the northeast and with its rapid currents feeds the Chicago and Illinois Canal, which follows the banks of the Illinois River.  In 1854 Ottawa had about 4,000 to 6,000 inhabitants.  The bridge over the Illinois River was under constriction connecting South Ottawa with the main city on the North.  Ottawa was and still is the LaSalle County seat.  In 1854 Ottawa had a mill on the Illinois River that turned out 100 barrels of flour per day.  Ottawa also had a foundry, two large machine shops, and other large manufacturers.” [11]

The same year(1854) that Charles came to Ottawa, he applied to become a United States Citizen in the LaSalle County Circuit Court. 12]   I often wondered what brought Charles to Ottawa, Illinois when it appears that his brothers and father stayed in New York.  I recently found that his step-brother William Linfor(d) was living in Ottawa, Illinois in 1854.[13]  You can read my post “Finding Brother William” published November 24, 2012 on this blog.  I assume that Charles came to Ottawa because he knew William Linfor.                      

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

On August 21, 1858 the first Lincoln-Douglas debate took place in Ottawa at the stand in Washington Park.[14]  I wonder if Charles attended and what his thoughts were about the two men.  He was not yet a United States citizen so he could not vote.  He became a naturalized citizen of the United States in January 1859.  He signed his naturalization papers with an X indicating he could not write.[15]

In 1860 Charles is found living in Lisbon, Kendall County, Illinois working on a farm and living with a family by the name of Leach.[16]  Charles bought a house In 1868 on the corner of Chapel and York Streets (543 Chapel Street) in Ottawa, Illinois for $1,000 cash from William K and Ellen M. Stewart of Ottawa, Illinois.  The house sits on a high bluff across the street from the Fox River.  It is located in a rather well-to-do area of Ottawa surrounded by Victorian houses.  Charles’ house is rather modest compared to houses around it.[17]  The house had living room, dining room, kitchen, parlor, storage room, and one bedroom on first floor.  The second floor had four bedrooms and bath (bath may have been added later).[18]

In December 1868 Charles married Alexena Frazer.[19]  They had five children Richard, Elizabeth, Robert, Genevieve, and Ethelyn.[20]   There may have been two children who died as infants.  According to Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records there is an E. E. and a J.A. Bowers buried in grave one.[21]

Charles worked as a janitor for the East Ottawa Public School.[22]  He and Alexena lived at 543 Chapel Street in Ottawa.[23]  He was a member of the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows for over 30 years.  He was a kind-hearted man, patient with children and liked by everyone.[24]  Charles died in 1897 and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, in Ottawa, Illinois.[25

Bowers' Family Headstone

Bowers’ Family Headstone

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst                        


[1]Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3]Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[4] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[5] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[6] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[8] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm serial M237; Microfilm roll: M237-107; Line: 26; List number 1664.  Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line].  Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006 Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington D.C.

[9] Year: 1860, Census Place: Onondaga, Onondaga, New York, Roll: M653_829, Page 579; Image: 367. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA. The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860.  Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1438 rolls.

[10]Year: 1870 Census Place: Syracuse Ward 7, Onondaga, New York; Roll M593_1063; Page: 464; Image: 239. Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870 United States Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington D. C. National Archives and Records Administration, M593, RG29. 1761 rolls.

[11] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 39.

[12] Declaration of Intent (naturalization) for Charles Bowers, LaSalle County, Illinois,  Circuit Court, LaSalle County, Illinois Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois; Book 2, Pg. 227.

[13]  (Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227. 

[14] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 45.

[15] Final naturalization record for Charles Bowers.  LaSalle County Illinois, Circuit Court LaSalle County, Illinois  Court House, Ottawa, Illinois; Book E, Pg. 85.

[16] Ancestry.com 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA:  The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Eight Census of the United States, 1860, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration 1860, M653.               

[17] Author’s personal view of the house after visiting the area and seeing the house first hand in July of 2008.

[18] Probate File of Elizabeth A. Bowers Record A-6 page 176.  In possession of the LaSalle County Genealogical Guild, 115 Glover W. Glover, Ottawa, Illinois.

[19] Marriage License and certificate for Charles Bowers and Alexena Frazer.  License issued November 25, 1868, office of the clerk of the county, LaSalleCounty, Ottawa, Illinois.  Marriage date December 2, 1868 by Abraham R. Moore, Minister of the Gospel, filed with the LaSalle Illinois, CountyClerk office, LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois.

[20] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[21] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records; Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois, Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

[22] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[23] Ottawa Illinois City Directories 1866 – 1912.

[24] Obituary for Charles Bowers: Republican Times (Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois) February 18, 1897.

[25] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery Records: Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois. Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

Bowers Family 1757-1955 (part 2)

Church in EnglandSt. Clements Church and Graveyard

Bonnet Bowers was born in West Acre, Norfolk, England about October 12, 1795.[1]  On April 27, 1822 he married Eliza Linford in Terrington-St Clements Norfolk, England.[2]  Eliza was a widow according to their marriage record, and had a son William Linford[3] from her previous marriage.  You can read about William in my blog post Finding Brother William dated 11/24/2012.  Bonnet and Eliza had four children Richard born 1822[4], Robert born 1825[5], Eliza born in 1827[6] and Charles born in 1828.[7] All the children were born in Terrington-St Clements, Norfolk, England.[8]  The daughter, Eliza, died when she was less than 3 days old and was buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England[9] along with her mother Eliza, who was also buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England on January 22, 1831.[10]

The population of Terrington-St Clements in 1801 was 824.[11]   “In AD 970 Godric gifted part of the lands of Turrintonea to the monks of Ramsey Abbey. The name Terrington comes from the early Saxon “Tun” meaning enclosure or homestead of Tir(a)s people. The settlement is referred to in the Domesday Book as Tilinghetuna.  By the medieval period the small settlement which began on raised ground on the edge of the marsh had grown substantially. The magnificent Parish Church, dedicated to St Clement (i.e. Pope Clement I), known as the “Cathedral of the Marshland”, was built in the 14th century by Edmund Gonville, Rector of Terrington, who founded Gonville Hall (now Gonville and Caius College) at Cambridge University.”[12]

“During the 1840’s Social problems dominated the economic and scene.  The first part of the decade was referred to as the “hungry forties”.  Food prices were high.  A depression threw people out of work.  By 1842 fifteen percent of the population received public assistance and many more received assistance from charities.  In the late 1840’s a new prosperity arose because of the technological revolution and the coming of the railways.”[13]

By 1841 Bonnet Bowers is found living in Stockport, MacClesfield, Cheshire, England along with sons Richard, Robert, and Charles.[14]   Bonnet Bowers was an agricultural laborer.[15]  This means that he was one of the poor working class and earned just enough money to stay alive.  Because manual labor was so physically demanding, men were paid the most during their 20’s when they were in peak physical condition.  After that their pay would go down as they got older.[16]

Women worked as domestic servants, did needlework, midwife, cooking, and many, many more jobs.  Some women even worked in the coal mines until 1842 when the practice of using women underground to haul sledge and coal ended, however women continued to work above ground sorting and loading coal.  Other physical jobs women held during this time were brick making, chain making, and collecting trash from city streets. [17]

The children started working very young and had little schooling.  Some children started working as early as three or four year of age.  In general most children were working by the time they were nine years old.[18]  With the children working the family might be able to accumulate a little savings which they would need once the children married and set up their households.  By the time the children married, the poor food and hard labor weakened the parent’s health.  If they lived to be very old they might end their days in a workhouse unless their children earned enough to take care of them.[19]

The countryside, laborers’ cottage was one or two rooms and the floor was dirt (packed tight) or paving stones.  The cottage was furnished with a table, chairs, cupboard, a shelf, and one or two beds.  Food was cooked over an open fire in a large fireplace.  All eating, sleeping and living were done in a single room.  Sometimes a curtain was pulled for privacy.  The tables sometimes were not big enough for the whole family to sit around.  It was not uncommon for children to be sent elsewhere to sleep, perhaps with an older couple, whose family was grown so teenagers of opposite sex would not have to share beds.[20]

Since Bonnet Bowers and his family were very likely poor, his children might not have had much time to play because they were working. If they had time to play as children, they played with whatever was available at little or no expense.  Games were outdoor running and chasing, and hide and seek.  Purchased toys such as tops and rubber balls were special treats brought home from a fair or put into a Christmas stocking.[21]

Bonnet came to the United States in 1851 with his son Charles.[22]  He lived in Onondaga, Onondaga, New York with his son Robert.[23]  Bonnet died on February 9, 1871 in the town of Onondaga, New York.[24]

 

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst
_________________________________

[1] Baptism for Bonnet Tomas Bowers baptized 12 October 1795; Church of England.  Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah 2001.

[2]  Marriage Record for Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford married 27 April 1822; Register of Marriages in the Parish of Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; 1813-1838 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3] Baptism for William Linford, 28 August 1811; Terrington-St. Slement, Norfolk England: Parish Register Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812 Item 2; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs., filmed 26 July 1988, Film Number 13640109, film unit # 2161 NCD 2 Roll # 5.

[4] Baptism Record for Richard Bowers baptized 20 April 1822; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[5] Baptism Record for Robert Bowers baptized 25 February 1825; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[6] Baptism Record for Eliza Bowers baptized 10 June 1827; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[7] Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[8] See footnotes 4 – 7.

[9] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (daughter of Bonnet & Eliza Bowers) buried on 21 June 1827. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[10] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[11] http://visionofbritain.org.uk Vision of Britain website.

[13] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 5.

[14] Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841.Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841.  Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. Class: HO107; Piece 109; Book: 8; Civil Parish: Stockport; County: Cheshire; Enumeration District: 8; Folio: 19; Page: 33; Line: 4; GSU roll: 241242.

[15] Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841.Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841.  Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. Class: HO107; Piece 109; Book: 8; Civil Parish: Stockport; County: Cheshire; Enumeration District: 8; Folio: 19; Page: 33; Line: 4; GSU roll: 241242.

[16]  Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 18 – 20.

[17] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 47-48.

[18] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 43 – 44.

[19] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 20.

[20] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 114.

[21] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 229.

[22] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[23] Year: 1860; Census Place: Onondaga, Onondaga, New York; Roll: M653_829; Page: 579; Image: 370; Family History Library Film: 803829.

[24] Syracuse Standard (Syracuse, Onondaga Co., New York) Death Notice for a Burnett (sp) Bowers.

 

Bowers Family 1757 – 1955 (Part 1)

I’ve written a family history on the Bowers Family (my grandmother’s paternal side) covering almost 200 years from 1757 – 1947.  I am posting it on my blog in installments.  Here is the first installment starting with my Great-Great-Great-Great Grandfather and Grandmother.

The Bowers’ Family History starts out in Westacre, Norfolk, England with Charles Bowers born about 1757[1] and Sarah Bonnet born about 1757[2] and the birth of their first child, Charles in 1781.[3]  The first son Charles may have died as a young child because Charles and Sarah have another child born in 1784 named Charles[4] followed by John in 1786,[5] William in 1788,[6] Richard in 1790,[7] twins Mary and Sarah in 1792,[8] Mary in 1793,[9] Bonnet Thomas in 1795,[10] another Sarah in 1797,[11] Robert in 1801,[12] and Thomas in 1802.[13]  The Twin daughters Mary and Sarah died when they were about two months old.[14] [15] Their son Robert died in 1804,[16] daughter Sarah died in 1805,[17] and son Thomas in 1819[18]. In total they had 12 children and four (possibly five) died at a young age.  The two Charles’, John, William, Richard, Mary, Sarah, Mary, Bonnet, and Sarah were born in Westacre, Norfolk, England.[19] Robert and Thomas were born in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England.[20] The twins Mary and Sarah are buried in Westacre, Norfolk England.[21] Robert, Sarah, and Thomas are buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England.[22]  Sarah Bonnet Bowers died at age 69 and was buried on February 1, 1826 in Terrington-St. Clements.[23]  Charles lived to the ripe old age of 81 and was buried January 16, 1839 in Terrington-St. Clements.[24]

 

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst


[1] Burial record for Charles Bowers buried on January 16, 1838 age 81; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Register of Burials in the Parish of Terrington-St. Clements in the County of Norfolk (England); Burials Volume 3, 1813 – 1856; Manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Page 113; microfilmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (Wife of Charles Bowers) buried on February 1, 1826 age 69; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington-St. Cements, Norfolk, England. Register of Burials in the Parish of Terrington-St. Clements in the County of Norfolk (England) Burials Volume 3, 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Page 54; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3] Baptism record for Charles Bowers baptized 26 October 1781; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 8, Page 256; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[4] Baptism record for Charles Bowers baptized 07 January 1784; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 887920; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[5] Baptism record for John Bowers baptized 22 January 1786; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[6] Baptism record for William Bowers Baptized 03 August 1788; Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[7] Baptism record for Richard Bowers baptized 26 October 1790; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[8] Baptism record for Mary and Sarah Bowers baptized 13 January 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704 Item 9 Page 274; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[9] Baptism for Mary Bowers baptized 23 September 1793; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 887920; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[10] Baptism for Bonnet Thomas Bowers baptized 12 October 1795; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704 Item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[11] Baptism for Sarah Bowers baptized 30 December 1797; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[12] Baptism for Robert Bowers Baptized 22 March 1801; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers 1598 – 1964; manuscript on microfilm # 1546346 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[13] Baptism for Thomas Bowers Baptized 24 January 1802; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812; manuscript on microfilm # 13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[14] Burial record for Mary Bowers (born 13 January 1792); Died on 11 March 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 283; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001

[15] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born 13 January 1792); Died on March 6, 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 283; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[16] Burial record for Robert Bowers died on 04 July 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[17] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 30 December 1797) died in 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[18] Burial record for Thomas Bowers (born 24 January 1802) buried 16 April 1819; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[19] See footnotes 3 – 15.

[20] See footnotes 11 & 13.

[21] See footnotes 15 & 16.

[22] See footnotes 17, 18, 19.

[23] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 1757) buried 8 February 1826; ; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[24] Burial Record for Charles Bowers (born abt 1757)buried 16 January 1838; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Terrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambrigeshire, England

 

Finding Brother William

Picture from:

Henley B. J., The Art of Longevity (Google eBook) (Syracuse, N.Y, 1911), p. 222.

I always wondered how or why my Great-Great Grandfather, Charles Bowers, ended up in Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois.  His Obituary in 1897 said he had two brothers, Robert and William, living in Syracuse, New York[1].  I did find a Robert living in Syracuse in 1900[2] and Richard Bowers[3] living in Syracuse, New York in 1892, but no William.  I often wondered if Richard was William.  Maybe William was his middle name.  I gave up looking for William and thought perhaps the newspaper or person giving the information had it wrong.

A while ago I ordered microfilm from the Family History Library in Utah to look for my great-great grandfather Charles Bower’s baptism on 2 October 1828 in England.[4]  I knew it was there from the online index.  When I got the microfilm reels of the church records it covered the years 1772 – 1905.  I started looking for anyone and everyone with the last name Bowers.  I found my third great grandparents Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford marriage which stated that Eliza was a widow.[5]   I also found baptism records for a Richard,[6] Robert[7] and Eliza Bowers[8] born to Bonnet and Eliza Bowers.  I never found a William Bowers that was a son of Bonnet and Eliza.  Along the way, I found Eliza in the marriage banns to Robert Linford.[9]  I also found two children she had with her first husband.  William was baptized 28 August 1811,[10] and Elizabeth was baptized November 30, 1814.[11] I made copies of all the pages that listed these events.  I then came home and entered the Bowers information into my family tree.  I filed the papers in my file cabinet under their family name and moved on to another branch.

A couple of weeks ago I decided to start scanning documents that I have collected over the years into my computer.  I started with the Bowers folder because it is the first one in my file cabinet.  As I was scanning them into the computer, I was looking over them again, when I came across the name William Linford born in 1811 to Eliza and her first husband.[12]  I guess it pays to take a second look at documents because at that moment it struck me that if William lived he would be a step brother to my great-great grandfather Charles.  Could this be the brother William mentioned in the Obituary?  The next thing I did was a search on William Linford.  The first thing in that popped up was the 1850 census which had a William Linfor (spelled without the d) living in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.[13]  So this was most likely brother, William, and this why Charles ended up in Ottawa, Illinois.  Finding out why Charles ended up in Ottawa, Illinois was a thrill for me.  Now I wonder what drew William to Ottawa, Illinois.

I continued to search for William Linfor(d) and found out the following information. He married Dinah Essaby in 1833.[14]  They had four children John 1837, William 1840, Sarah 1844, Robert 1846.[15]  They came to the US 22 August 1849 and to Ottawa, Illinois on 1 October 1849.[16]  In 1851 William applied for citizenship and in 1854 he became a citizen of the United States.[17]  He worked as a Sexton at the West Ottawa Cemetery until the family moved to Section 20 in Allen Township, LaSalle County, Illinois in 1856.  William farmed the land until 1879 when Dinah died and he moved to Syracuse, New York.[18]

In 1911 William Linfor was living at 1516 Grape Street in Syracuse, New York.  At the age of 99 he was just beginning to carry a cane.  The previous winter he was seen climbing a ladder to clean snow the roof of his house.  He attributed his long life to never eating beyond what he knew he could digest.  He was still in possession of all his faculties except his hearing.[19] William Linfor died on 28 January 1912 of pleurisy at the ripe old age of 100.[20] 

John served in the Civil War, and upon return home he continued to live and work on the family farm.  In 1865 he married Martha E. Patton, and they had two children, Flossie E. and Ida L.  Flossie married John Blair of Allen Township and they had one Child, Flossie.  Ida L. married Otto Strobel also of Allen Township and they had two children Martha C. and William O.[21]

Robert also served in the Civil War. After the war he returned home to farm with John.  In 1875 Robert started farming his own tract of 160 acres.  In 1867 he married Cynthia Alice Isgrig, and they had four children Carrie, Lottie, John W, Mabel.  Carrie married West Grant of Chicago, Illinois and Lottie married A. Berge of Allen Township. [22] 

William (Son) moved to Walnut, Iowa and married Lodema.  They had five children Cora S, William G, Robert, Charles, and Claud.[23] [24] 

Sarah Linfor Golder died in Kansas in 1873.[25]

There is still more searching to do as I would like to continue down to today’s descendants.


[1] Obituary for Charles Bowers; Republican Times  (Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois) 18 February 1897.

[2]United States Census; Year: 1900; Place: Village of Danforth, Onondaga, New York; enumeration District: 161 District 2 Scyracuse City Ward 19, Onondaga, New York; Page: 3B; Family; 63; NARA Publication Film T623; Microfilm: 1241138.

[3]New York State Census; Year 1892; Place: Syracuse, Onondaga, New York; Ward: 7; enumeration District: 9; Image: 10.

[4] Baptism Record for Charles Bowers 2 October, 1828; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Baptisms 1813 – 1841 Vol 3, Page 112, No 891;  Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed 26 July 1988, film #13640109, film Unit 2161, MCD 2, Roll # 5.

[5] Marriage Record for Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford  7 April 1822; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Marriages 1813 – 1838 volume 4 Page 35; Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed August 1988, film #13640109, film unit ser no 2161 MCD 2 Roll #11.

[6] Baptism Record for Richard Bowers 28 April 1822; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Baptism 1813 – 1841 Vol e, Page 68, No 539; ;  Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed 26 July 1988, film #13640109, film Unit 2161, MCD 2, Roll # 5.

[7] Baptism Record for Robert Bowers 25 February 1825; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Baptism 1813 – 1841 Vol 3 Page 90 No 713; Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed 26 July 1988, film #13640109, film Unit 2161, MCD 2, Roll # 5.

[8] Baptism Record for Eliza Bowers 18 June 1827; Terrington St Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Baptism 1813 – 1841 Vol 3 Page 105 No 835; Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed 26 July 1988, film #13640109, film Unit 2161, MCD 2, Roll # 5.

[9] Marriage Banns for Robert Linford and Elizabeth Huggleson dated 7 day October 1810, 14 October, 1810, and 21 October 1810, Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers, Banns 1806 – 1905, Item 4, Vol. 1, Page 8, no 39; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at the Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, cambs; filmed 9 August 1988, film #13640109, film unit ser. No 2161 MCD 2, Roll # 12

[10] Baptism for William Linford 28 August 1811; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Register Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812  Item 2; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs., filmed 26 July 1988, Film Number 13640109, film unit # 2161 NCD 2 Roll # 5.

[11] Baptism Record for Elizabeth Linford 30 November 1814; Terrington St Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers Baptisms 1813 – 1841 Vol 3, # 114; Microfilmed by Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs; filmed 26 July 1988, film #13640109, film Unit 2161, MCD 2, Roll # 5.

[12] Baptism for William Linford 28 August 1811; Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; Parish Register Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812  Item 2; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs., filmed 26 July 1988, Film Number 13640109, film unit # 2161 NCD 2 Roll # 5

[13]  Year: 1850; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; roll: M432_115; Page: 269B; Image: 191.

[14] “England, Marriages, 1538 – 1973,” Index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/Pal:MM9.1.1/NF4Q-JXW: accessed 18 Nov 2012), William Linfor and Dinah Essaby, 1833; citing reference 2:3GJG91D, FLH microfilm 1542146.

[15] Year: 1850; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; roll: M432_115; Page: 269B; Image: 191

[16] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227.

[17] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D. C.; Soundex Index to Naturalization Petitions for the United States District and Circuit Courts, Northern District of Illinois and Immigration and Naturalization service District 9 1840 – 1950 (M1285); microfilm Serial: M1285; Microfilm Roll 112

[18] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 224 & 227.

[19] Henley B. J., The Art of Longevity (Google eBook) (Syracuse, N.Y, 1911), p. 223 & 224.

[20] Health News. Monthly Bulletin (Google ebook) (New York State Division of Public Health Education, Albany, New York), New Series, Vol. VIII, No 1, Full Series Vol. XXIX No 1,  January 1013

[21] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227 & 228.

[22] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 224 & 225.

[23] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 224.

[24]United States Census; Year: 1880; Place: Walnut, Pottawatomie, Iowa; Roll: 361; Family History Film: 1254361; Page: 192D; Enumeration District: 190; Image 0387

[25] Biographical and Genealogy Record of LaSalleCountyIllinois(Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227.

Copyright © 2012 Gail Grunst

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