Bowers Family History 1757 – 1955 Part 6

Elizabeth Bowers

Elizabeth Bowers

 

 

Elizabeth Bowers was the first daughter born to Charles and Alexena Bowers in 1871 in Ottawa, Illinois.[1]  Elizabeth grew up in Ottawa, Illinois.  Elizabeth graduated from Ottawa High School.[2]   Elizabeth became a school teacher and taught school at Lincoln School in Ottawa, Illinois.[3]  She was educated at the University of Chicago.  Later she became a primary supervisor in the Ottawa grade school system.  Elizabeth spoke at teacher institutes and professional meetings throughout the state. Elizabeth lived in Ottawa until the time of her death in 1947.[4]  She attended the First Church of Christ, Scientist of Ottawa.[5]  She is buried at the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery in Ottawa, Illinois.[6]

A personal Note:  When I was a child we would visit family friends in Ottawa.  They had a daughter, Barb, who was about my age, and I would spend anywhere from a week to three weeks during summer staying with the family.  Barb and I would play on the Lincoln School playground.  Of course I wasn’t interested in genealogy at the time.  I had some vague knowledge that my grandmother came from Ottawa, Illinois and we had ancestors who lived there, but that was all.  While playing on school playground, I didn’t know that I had an ancestor who had been a school teacher at this school.  Now I think about how I walked on the same ground that Elizabeth walked on many years before me.  It makes me feel connected to her in some small way. She looks like my grandmother or should I say my grandmother looks like her so I feel as though I knew her.

Elizabeth's Retirement Party one

Elizabeth's Retirement Party threeElizabeth's Retirement Party two

Elizabeth’s Retirement Party

 

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst


[1] Year: 1880; Census Place:  Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Roll: 79_223; Family History Film: 1254223; Page: 516.2000; Enumeration District: 81 Image: 0554.  Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.

[2] Obituary for Elizabeth Bowers; Obituary given to author by Helen Kaiser.  No notations as to what paper obituary is from.

[3] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 175

[4] Obituary for Elizabeth Bowers; Obituary given to author by Helen Kaiser.  No notations as to what paper obituary is from.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Cemetery Record for Elizabeth Bowers, Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Date of Death January 31, 1947; Burial location OT, 18-7; Funeral Home Gladfelter; Cemetery card CCNF-noTS; Record number 10315.

 

Bowers Family History 1757 – 1955 Part 5

Richard Bowers

Richard Bowers was the oldest son born to Charles and Alexena Bowers in 1869.[1]  It is not known how far Richard went school.  Richard worked as a clerk, motorman, and janitor.[2]  He spent many years working as janitor at Washington School, probably the same one he attended as a boy.[3]  He also worked for the Illinois Power and Light Company.[4]  He married Emma Barnhardt in 1892 in Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois[5]   This is just speculation, but I am wondering if Richard’s parents Charles and Alexena didn’t accept his marriage to Emma.  The reason I say this is that Richard’s parents are not mentioned in the marriage announcement in the Free Trader newspaper dated 30 July 1892.[6] Emma and Richard made their home in Ottawa, Illinois.[7] [8] [9] There is no evidence that Richard and Emma had any children.

Richard is the only one of my grandmother, Helen Bowers, father’s family that she knew.  She came to know Richard after everyone else in her father’s family had passed away.  She referred to him as Uncle Lamb.   She never mentioned how she came to know him.  But it was her only connection to her father and his family.  The pictures of the family probably come from him.  I found a letter from Richard’s wife, Emma, to my grandmother.  I have transcribed it below as well as posted copies of the original letter.  It was very hard to read the writing and did my best to transcribe it.

 

Ottawa, Ill Aug 17th 1954

Dear Helen and all,

Glad to hear from you.  I am same but Uncle Lamb’s memory is so bad, he doesn’t remember things or people and now he has been in bed quite a while.  We have the Dr. and had him every day and now he comes twice a week and gives him liver shots.  Uncle Lamb is awfully weak and so makes it still harder for me.  I don’t get to rest and sleep I need.  He is restless at night and worries me should I go to sleep I wouldn’t hear him.  I don’t hear so good in one ear especially.  Some time ago, I had an abscess in that ear and suppose that is the reason now that I don’t hear so good.  I don’t know what I would do without Helen she sure is awfully good to us.  Nice you can go to your daughter’s when you want to.  It is to bad Russ had to be away, no doubt you are awfully lonely without him.  I’ve been having awful head aches and never feel good but have to keep going and hope I can.  I don’t want him taken to the hospital if it is possible he can stay home.  Sorry about Francis, I haven’t heard from her since she wrote at Christmas time.   Was glad to see your card and was sorry we were not here.  Decorating time when she called although true Uncle Lamb could ride out but of course not go out of the car so me now to decorate our graves and we have a lot to decorate.

Helen does ever thing she can for us.  I just don’t know what I would do without her.  My Sister was here for a little while last Tuesday she, her son, her daughter, and husband was so glad see them.  You see out of a large family only my sister and I are still here.  My sister’s son has been out of work for some time is of course trying to get work he had to quit the last place he worked was to hard for him he hasn’t been very well so I worry about them along with my own worrys but I so want him to get work.  Well dear Helen give our love to Francis and Pat.  I have written a couple of times so when she cans she will write.  I am sorry she is not well. 

Have to stop now but we send love to all and hope you keep well and think of us some time.  Do you hear from Ralph’s folks.  I can tell you just love Uncle Lamb, he sure is not good. I am so tired all the time as I say I don’t get the rest and sleep I need.  Thank you dear Helen for wishing us well, we sure do need it he is quiet now the reason I am writing have to hurry so I hope you can read it.  Pray your son get home safe and Francis gets better give them our love.

                                                                                                                                                Lovingly,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Aunt Emma Uncle Lamb

Will try to do better next time.

Image (4)Image (5)Image (6)Image (7)Image (8)

Richard died in 1955 and is buried at the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.[10]  Emma died a few years later in 1961 and is buried next to Richard in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.[11]

Note:  I changed the title of the blogs to Bower Family History 1757 – 1955.  When I started writing these stories, I was thinking that Richard’s sister Elizabeth was the last of Charles’ children to die in 1947.  When writing Richard’s biography, I realized that I was wrong, so therefore have changed the last part of post title to 1955.

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst


[1] Cemetery record for Richard Bowers, Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Date of Birth March 9, 1869; Date of Death November 18, 1955;  Funeral Home:  Hulse; Burial location: OT-23-7 (NW ¼); Cemetery Card: CCY-TS;  Record Number 8573

[2] Ottawa City Directories 1884, 1888, 1894.  LaSalle County, Illinois Genealogy Guild, 115 West Glover, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Obituary for Richard Bowers, Daily Republican Times, Ottawa, Illinois, Vol 79, no 121, 1955,

p. 12.

[5] Marriage Record for Richard Bowers and Emma Barnhart, Illinois State Board of Health, Return of Marriage to the County Clerk, July 28, 1892, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.

[6] Marriage announcement for Richard Bowers and Emma Barnhardt, Free Trader, July 30, 1892.  File at LaSalle County Genealogy Guild, 115 West Glover, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois, Marriages 1888 – 1893.

[7]Ottawa City Directories 1884, 1888, 1894.  LaSalle County, Illinois Genealogy Guild, 115 West Glover, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois.

[8]Year: 1920; Census Place: Ottawa Ward 2, La Salle, Illinois; Roll: T625_379; Page: 5A; enumeration District: 138; Image 123.  Ancestry.com 1920 Untied States Federal Census [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA:  The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.  For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA

[9] Year: 1930; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Roll: 532; Page: 13B; Enumeration District: 68; Image 88.0.  Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo,  UT, USA:  The Generations Network, Inc., 2002

[10] Cemetery record for Richard Bowers, Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Date of Birth March 9, 1869; Date of Death November 18, 1955;  Funeral Home:  Hulse; Burial location: OT-23-7 (NW ¼); Cemetery Card: CCY-TS;  Record Number 8573.

[11] Cemetery record for Emma Barnhardt Bowers, Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Date of Birth; November 17, 1866; Date of Death; January 18, 1961; Funeral Home Hulse; Burial location: OT-23-7(NS ¼) Cemetery Card CCY-noTS; Record Number 8572

Bowers Family History 1757 – 1955 Part 4

Alexena Frazier Bowers

Alexena Frazier Bowers

Alexena Frazier was born in 1847 in NassagaweyaTownship, Halton, Ontario, Canada[1] to David Frazier and Catherine McBean.[2]  Both David Frazier and Catherine McBean were born in Scotland.[3]  It is likely that David and Catherine Frazier were Highlander’s belonging to the Kirk as large numbers of these people settled in Nassagaweya forming a major Scottish block.[4]

“To the European settlers who came to southern Ontario, the land was a hostile wilderness, waiting to be tamed. For agriculture to proceed the forest had to go and much of it was piled and burned. Until the 1850s, farming was dominated by land clearing and the incessant toil of pioneer life.”[5]  Wheat and Lumber were the main products of Halton County Ontario in the 1840’s and 1850’s.[6]

Alexena came to Ottawa, Illinois in 1865,[7] and married Charles Bowers in 1868.[8]  Charles and Alexena made their home at 543 Chapel Street.[9]  They had five children, Richard, Robert, Elizabeth, Genevieve and Ethelyn. [10]

She attended the First Methodist Episcopal Church and was an active member with a large circle of friends. [11]

Alexena’s granddaughter, Helen Bowers, told stories that her grandparents did not want to acknowledge that their son Robert married and had children.  Helen claimed that they thought they were better than her mother’s family.  Therefore she did not know her father’s family[12].  The probate of Alexena’s will confirms this story to be true.

The following is a transcript from Alexena’s will in Probate Court for proof of heirship:

On the 26th day of June 1926 R Ethel Vittum, a competent witness of lawful age produced sworn and examined on oath in open court, testified as follows, to-wit:

C. B. Chapman

Q. Your name is R. Ethelyn Vittum?

A. Yes

Q. You reside in Ottawa, Illinois?

A. Yes

Q. You are a daughter of Alexena Bowers?

A. Yes

Q. When did she die?

A. March 7, 1926

Q. Where did she die?

A. At her residence 543 Chapel Street

Q. At the time of her death was she an actual resident of the city of Ottawa, County of LaSalle, State of Illinois?

A. She was

Q. About what was her age?

A. 79 years in August

Q. She was a citizen of the United States?

A. She was

Q. Did she leave a surviving husband?

A. No

Q. What was her husband’s name?

A. Charles Bowers

Q. And about how long ago did he die?

A. I think it was about thirty years ago

Q. Was she married more than once?

A. No

Q. How many Children were born of the marriage?

A. Five

Q. What were their names?

A. Richard L. Bowers, Elizabeth A. Bowers, Robert F. Bowers, Genevieve L. Bowers, myself.

Q. R. Ethel Bowers is yourself?

A. Yes

Q. And you are residing in Ottawa, Illinois?

A. Yes

Q. Is R. L. Bowers living?

A. He is

Q. And he is living in Ottawa, Illinois?

A. In Ottawa

Q. And Elizabeth Ann Bowers is living in Ottawa?

A. Yes

Q. Is Richard Bowers living?

A. Richard and R. L. are one and the same.  You mean Robert?

Q. Robert, I should say.

A. He is dead

Q. About how long ago did he die?

A. 13 years ago, I think.

Q. And was he married?

A. I don’t know, Mr. Chapman

Q. You haven’t any knowledge so that you could testify as to whether or not he was ever married?

A. No.

Q. Do you know whether or not there are living any persons who claim to be his children?

A. There was a few years ago.

Q. And do you know there names or the names that they go by?

A. I don’t think of the name, Mr. Chapman.

Q. Let me refresh your recollection.  Do you remember whether the persons who claim to be his children are Ralph Bowers?

A. Yes Ralph is one

Q. And Helen Kaiser?

A. I don’t know the Kaiser, but I know a Helen.

Q. Helen claimed to be Helen Bowers and you don’t know whether she is now married and whether her name is Kaiser.

A. No

Q. And Frances Bowers, who also claimed -

A. I think so.

Q. And do know that she is now married and her present name is Beck?

A. I don’t know.

Q.  Were there any other parties than Ralph, Helen and Frances that clamed to be children of Robert?

A. I don’t know of any others.

Q.  Never heard of any others?

A. Never.

Q.  And in matters where the question of the heirship of Robert was raised you knew that there was proof made and these three parties were found to be children of Robert, did you?

A. Yes

Q.  And found to be the only children of Robert?

A. Yes

Q. and the other child of Alexena Bowers was what?

A. Genevieve L.

Q. And she died in infancy?

A. Yes – Oh, no –

Q. Because she was-

A. Why she died about 29 years ago.

Q. Was she ever married?

A. No.

Q. Did your mother at any time ever adopt any children?

A. No.[13]

Alexena died on March 7, 1926 in her home in Ottawa.[14] [15] She was considered one of Ottawa’s oldest citizens having been a resident of more than 60 years when she died.[16]  She died of Carcinoma of the Gall Bladder[17] and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, in Ottawa, Illinois[18] along side her husband Charles and children.

Copyright©2013 Gail Grunst

_________________________________________

 [1] Obituary for Alexena Frazier Bowers: Republican Times (Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois) July 4, 1898.

 [2] “Death Certificate for Alexena Bowers”, March 7 1926 (filed March 9, 1926), registered number 37, State of Illinois, Department of Public Health – Division of Vital Statistics, Springfield, IL.

[3] Ibid.

  [4] Campey, Lucille H,. Scottish Pioneers of Upper Canada, 1784-1855: Glengarry and Beyond (Natural Heritage/Natural History Inc., 2005), p. 98.

 [6] Ibid.

[7]  Obituary for Alexena Bowers. Daily Republican Times, (Ottawa, LaSalle, IL) Monday Evening, 8 March, 1926; Vol XLIX, No 208, Page 1 (Front Page).

[8] “Marriage License for Charles Bowers and Alexena Frazer”, issued 25 November 1868, married 2 December 1868, filed 4 December 1868, Marriage license no 1862, State of Illinois, LaSalle County, La Salle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois.

[9] Obituary for Alexena Bowers. Daily Republican Times, (Ottawa, LaSalle, IL) Monday Evening, 8 March, 1926; Vol XLIX, No 208, Page 1 (Front Page).

[10] Year 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, LaSalle, Illinois; Roll: 79_223; Family History Film 1254223; Page: 516.1000 & 516.2000; Enumeration District: 81; Image: 0553, Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. United States Federal Census [database on-line].  Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, 2005

                [11]  Obituary for Alexena Bowers. Daily Republican Times, (Ottawa, LaSalle, IL) Monday Evening, 8 March, 1926; Vol XLIX, No 208, Page 1 (Front Page).

                [12]   Story told to author many times over the years (1960 – 1981) by Helen Bowers Kaiser.

                [13] “Probate of  will of Alexena Bowers” (Proof of Heirship), 26 June 1926, LaSalle County, Illinois,  Old Estate Books,  File 1,  Box 954., LaSalle County Court House, Ottawa, Illinois. Photocopy of original in possession of this writer.

[14] “Death Certificate for Alexena Bowers”, March 7, 1926 (filed March 9, 1926), registered number 37, State of Illinois, Department of Public Health – Division of Vital Statistics, Springfield, IL.

                [15] Obituary for Alexena Bowers. Daily Republican Times, (Ottawa, LaSalle, IL) Monday Evening, 8 March, 1926; Vol XLIX, No 208, Page 1 (Front Page).

                [16] Ibid.

                [17]  “Death Certificate for Alexena Bowers”, March 7, 1926 (filed March 9, 1926), registered number 37, State of Illinois, Department of Public Health – Division of Vital Statistics, Springfield, IL.

                [18] Ibid.

Bowers Family 1757 – 1955 Part 3

Charles Bowers

Charles Bowers

Charles was born in 1828 in Terrington-St Clements, Norfolk, England to Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford.[1]  Charles’ mother died when he was just a little over two years old.[2]  Charles grew up in England with his father and brothers.  One wonders if Bonnet had help with the care of the children.  There were aunts and uncles living in Terrington-St. Clements perhaps they helped.

Charles left England when he was just 21 years old. He left Liverpool, England on February 1, 1851 with his father Bonnet Bowers aboard the sailing ship Conqueror of New York.[3]   If Charles had friends or family already in the United States they might have paid for his passage.  If his passage was not previously paid he would have to pay his passage and make the best bargain he could with the passenger-brokers.  The competition in this trade was very great, and fares varied from day-to-day, and even from hour to hour, sometimes as high as 5 pounds per passenger in the steerage and sometimes as low as 3 pounds 10 shillings.[4]

Charles’ experience immigrating to the United States was probably much like the following description of the typical emigrants experience leaving England through Liverpool.  “Notices were placed though out Liverpool with dates of sailing.  Most of the ships were owned and operated out of New York.   The average number of steerage passengers accommodated by most ships at that time was 400, but some had room for double that amount.  After the emigrant had chosen the ship that he would sail on, he had to bargain with the “man-catchers” a class of persons who received commission from the passenger- brokers for each emigrant they brought to the office of the passenger-broker.

The emigrant’s next duty was to present himself to the medical inspector.  A medical practitioner appointed by the emigration office of the port had to inspect the passengers to check for contagious diseases.  When the emigrant and his family had undergone this process, their passage-ticket was stamped, and they had nothing further to do until it was time to board.

The scene at the Waterloo dock in Liverpool, where all the American sailing ships were stationed was very busy at all times, but on the morning of the departure a large ship full of emigrants was particularly exciting and interesting.  Many of the emigrants boarded twenty-four hours before departure bringing quantities of provisions, although the government supplied the emigrants with liberal provisions to keep them in good health and comfort.

The following is the list of provisions provided by the government per week.

2 and ½ lbs of bread or biscuit

1 lb wheaten flour

5 lbs oatmeal

2 lbs rice

2 oz tea

½ lb sugar

½ lb molasses

3 quarts of water daily

On the day before sailing and during the time that a ship may be unavoidable detained in dock, some of the immigrants played the violin or bagpipes for their fellow passengers.   Young and old alike would dance and party.

A large number of spectators were at the dock-gates to witness the final departure of the ship full with anxious immigrants.  As the ship was towed out hats were raised, handkerchiefs waved, and people shouted their farewells from shore and the emigrants waved back from the ship.  It was at this moment emigrants realized this would be their last look at the old country.   A country in all probability associated with sorrow and suffering, of semi-starvation, never-the-less it was a country of their fathers, the country of their childhood, however little time was left to indulge in these reflections.

The ship was generally towed by a steam tug five or ten miles down the Mersey.  During this time the search for stowaways is done and a roll-call of passengers.  All passengers except those in state cabins were assembled on the quarter-deck.  The clerk of the passenger-broker, accompanied by the ship’s surgeon called for tickets.  A double purpose was answered by the roll-call, the verification of the passenger-list, and the medical inspection of the emigrants, on behalf of the captain and owners.  The previous inspection on the part of the governor was to prevent the risk of contagious disease on board.  The inspection on the part of the owners is for a different purpose.  The ship had to pay a poll tax of $1.50 per passenger to the State of New York; and if any of the poor emigrants were helpless and deformed, the owners were fined in the sum of $75.00 for bringing them and were compelled to enter in a bond to New York City so that they did not become a burden on the public.  The emigrants then settle in for the long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.[5] After almost 3 month of sailing across the ocean, Charles arrived at the Port of New York on April 21, 1851.[6]  Before 1855 there was no immigrant processing center.  The shipping company presented a passenger list to the Collector of Customs, and the immigrants made whatever customs declaration was necessary and went on their way.’[7]

Robert and his wife, Rhoda, followed to the United States in November 1851 aboard the ship Emma Field.[8] Robert, his wife, and Bonnet settled in Syracuse, New York[9].  At this time, I cannot find when Richard came to the United States, however he is found living in Syracuse, New York in 1870[10]

In 1855, just one year after Charles arrived in Ottawa, it became a chartered city.   “Ottawa, Illinois is situated at the junction of the Fox and Illinois rivers, nearly the geographical center of LaSalle County.  The Fox enters the Illinois from the northeast and with its rapid currents feeds the Chicago and Illinois Canal, which follows the banks of the Illinois River.  In 1854 Ottawa had about 4,000 to 6,000 inhabitants.  The bridge over the Illinois River was under constriction connecting South Ottawa with the main city on the North.  Ottawa was and still is the LaSalle County seat.  In 1854 Ottawa had a mill on the Illinois River that turned out 100 barrels of flour per day.  Ottawa also had a foundry, two large machine shops, and other large manufacturers.” [11]

The same year(1854) that Charles came to Ottawa, he applied to become a United States Citizen in the LaSalle County Circuit Court. 12]   I often wondered what brought Charles to Ottawa, Illinois when it appears that his brothers and father stayed in New York.  I recently found that his step-brother William Linfor(d) was living in Ottawa, Illinois in 1854.[13]  You can read my post “Finding Brother William” published November 24, 2012 on this blog.  I assume that Charles came to Ottawa because he knew William Linfor.                      

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Statue of Lincoln-Douglas Debate

On August 21, 1858 the first Lincoln-Douglas debate took place in Ottawa at the stand in Washington Park.[14]  I wonder if Charles attended and what his thoughts were about the two men.  He was not yet a United States citizen so he could not vote.  He became a naturalized citizen of the United States in January 1859.  He signed his naturalization papers with an X indicating he could not write.[15]

In 1860 Charles is found living in Lisbon, Kendall County, Illinois working on a farm and living with a family by the name of Leach.[16]  Charles bought a house In 1868 on the corner of Chapel and York Streets (543 Chapel Street) in Ottawa, Illinois for $1,000 cash from William K and Ellen M. Stewart of Ottawa, Illinois.  The house sits on a high bluff across the street from the Fox River.  It is located in a rather well-to-do area of Ottawa surrounded by Victorian houses.  Charles’ house is rather modest compared to houses around it.[17]  The house had living room, dining room, kitchen, parlor, storage room, and one bedroom on first floor.  The second floor had four bedrooms and bath (bath may have been added later).[18]

In December 1868 Charles married Alexena Frazer.[19]  They had five children Richard, Elizabeth, Robert, Genevieve, and Ethelyn.[20]   There may have been two children who died as infants.  According to Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records there is an E. E. and a J.A. Bowers buried in grave one.[21]

Charles worked as a janitor for the East Ottawa Public School.[22]  He and Alexena lived at 543 Chapel Street in Ottawa.[23]  He was a member of the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows for over 30 years.  He was a kind-hearted man, patient with children and liked by everyone.[24]  Charles died in 1897 and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, in Ottawa, Illinois.[25

Bowers' Family Headstone

Bowers’ Family Headstone

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst                        


[1]Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3]Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[4] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[5] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[6] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7] GEN UKI UK and Ireland Genealogy web site.  Extracts from an article printed in the Illustrated London News on Saturday July 6th 1850. It is a contemporary account of the procedure of Emigration from the port of Liverpool to the New World and the Colonies.

[8] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm serial M237; Microfilm roll: M237-107; Line: 26; List number 1664.  Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line].  Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006 Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington D.C.

[9] Year: 1860, Census Place: Onondaga, Onondaga, New York, Roll: M653_829, Page 579; Image: 367. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA. The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860.  Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1438 rolls.

[10]Year: 1870 Census Place: Syracuse Ward 7, Onondaga, New York; Roll M593_1063; Page: 464; Image: 239. Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870 United States Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington D. C. National Archives and Records Administration, M593, RG29. 1761 rolls.

[11] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 39.

[12] Declaration of Intent (naturalization) for Charles Bowers, LaSalle County, Illinois,  Circuit Court, LaSalle County, Illinois Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois; Book 2, Pg. 227.

[13]  (Google eBook) (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1900), p. 227. 

[14] Ottawa Old and New: A Complete History of Ottawa Illinois 1823 – 1914 (Ottawa, Illinois: Republican – Times Ottawa, 1912 – 1914), p. 45.

[15] Final naturalization record for Charles Bowers.  LaSalle County Illinois, Circuit Court LaSalle County, Illinois  Court House, Ottawa, Illinois; Book E, Pg. 85.

[16] Ancestry.com 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA:  The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.  Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Eight Census of the United States, 1860, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration 1860, M653.               

[17] Author’s personal view of the house after visiting the area and seeing the house first hand in July of 2008.

[18] Probate File of Elizabeth A. Bowers Record A-6 page 176.  In possession of the LaSalle County Genealogical Guild, 115 Glover W. Glover, Ottawa, Illinois.

[19] Marriage License and certificate for Charles Bowers and Alexena Frazer.  License issued November 25, 1868, office of the clerk of the county, LaSalleCounty, Ottawa, Illinois.  Marriage date December 2, 1868 by Abraham R. Moore, Minister of the Gospel, filed with the LaSalle Illinois, CountyClerk office, LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois.

[20] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[21] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery records; Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois, Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

[22] Year: 1880; Census Place: Ottawa, La Salle, Illinois; Roll T9 223: Family History Film 1243112; Page 516.10000, Enumeration District 81; Image: 0553.

[23] Ottawa Illinois City Directories 1866 – 1912.

[24] Obituary for Charles Bowers: Republican Times (Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois) February 18, 1897.

[25] Ottawa Avenue Cemetery Records: Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois. Record number 8539, Cemetery Card CCY-TS, Burial location OT18-7

JFK Assassination: My Memories

File:John F. Kennedy, White House color photo portrait.jpg

When I was sixteen, I kept a journal.  Here is what I wrote in my journal about the assassination of President Kennedy as things happened.  Keep in mind that this is written by a sixteen year old girl.  Some of the things we know about the assassination today were not known then.  I tried to transcribe it as it was written.  We only had four channels on TV at that time and all four ran nothing but the assassination.  There was no Internet, no VCR’s, no electronic games and businesses and stores were closing.  There was not much to do except watch TV.  There was no escaping the assassination.  So here is my account of the Kennedy assassination.

It was Friday, November 22, 1963.  I went to school that day like any other day. It was raining and my hair was almost straight from the weather.  All morning long I worried about how my hair looked.  On my way to English class I stopped at the washroom to comb my hair.  I left my comb at home and this made it a terrible day.  I went to English class, and in English we were to write a detective story.  The crime I picked was murder.  I had decided on this several days before when we were told we had to write a detective story.  My story would be the “Murder of Mrs. Jones”.  Sounds real exciting doesn’t it?  Well don’t laugh because I’m not too intelligent.  Little did I know that while I was creating a rough draft of the story, that the biggest murder in the county had taken place.  It was a murder that would affect me and millions of other people.  I was not yet aware of this murder, and not many people in the school were aware of it.  Almost each person found out in their own little way.  Here is the way I found out.  On the way to the school library, a bulletin came over the intercom and said, “President Kennedy has been shot and killed.”  I just about fainted and couldn’t believe it was true.  I met my friends in the library, and we talked about this terrible thing for a while.  But since the library was a place to be quiet, we had to be quiet.  We had to study or do anything as long as we were quiet.  I opened a book of Poe’s short stories and stared at it.  I sat there thinking of our now late president.  Some kids were crying.  At that moment, I couldn’t cry.  I don’t know why, but all I do know is I couldn’t believe it. I was so shocked!  I read time after time about Lincoln’s assassination. But that was 100 years ago.  This is today, this year, this century, this is 1963 and our country. This horrible thing is true and could happen here.  I was sitting in school and all I knew was the president was shot and dead.  Suddenly, my hair didn’t matter anymore. I struggled through seventh hour not doing any work. After school, I went to meet my mother who was picking me up from school.  On the way home we talked about the assassination.  When I got home, I turned on the TV to fill me in on what had happened. The president and Mrs. Kennedy were riding through a Dallas street in an open car with the Texas Governor and his wife.  They were worried that Kennedy wouldn’t get a good response in Texas. The crowds were good.  The governor’s wife turned to the president and said, “You can’t say Dallas doesn’t love you now Mr. President.”  Just then a shot rang out and the president slumped in Mrs. Kennedy’s arms.  Another shot came and the Governor was shot.  Still another shot came and the president was shot again.  The police were holding a man they thought killed President Kennedy.  His name is Lee Harvey Oswald.  Oswald was in a building on the 5th floor and shot President Kennedy with a high power rifle.  I cried when I heard all this on TV maybe because now it seemed real.

The President unconscious from the first bullet was in Mrs. Kennedy’s arms and her pink suit was splattered with blood.  We saw Vice President Johnson take the presidential oath on the presidential plane with his wife on one side and Mrs. Kennedy on the other side.  They arrived at the airport in Washington DC. and an ambulance met them to take the presidents body to the hospital.  Attorney General Robert Kenned was there to meet Mrs. Kennedy.  They got into the ambulance and went to the hospital.  The president’s body was taken to the White House during the night.

I think it is just terrible that a young man’s life can be taken so horribly.  The president, 46 years old, using his life in such a useful way.  I feel sorry for Mrs. Kennedy only 34 and her two young children, Caroline to be 6 next Wednesday and John Jr. to be 3 on Monday, the day of the funeral.

Friday night I entertained myself by baking a cake and cutting my hair.  I went to bed that night trying to forget about the horrible thing that had happened that day. How do you forget the assassination of the President of the United States?  You just don’t that’s all.  I finally got to sleep and woke up Saturday morning wishing it was a dream.

By Saturday night they said they clinched the case.  Lee Oswald assassinated President John F. Kennedy.  By the way Governor of Texas lived but was seriously injured.   My friend, Ginny, and I sat in my house and read the early edition of the Sunday paper.  After Ginny left, I broke up something terrible.  I cried and I cried over again.

I said all kinds of things about Oswald perhaps is shouldn’t have said.  They said that he wanted to get citizenship in Russia and after not being able to obtain it, he got a government loan for he and his Russian wife to come to the United States.  I wondered out loud what in the world was wrong with our government for letting people like this back into the United States.  Oswald gave papers out about communism and Cuba and Castro.  If all this was so wonderful, why didn’t he stay in Russia or Cuba, probably because they didn’t want him.  It isn’t fair that because some goof who wants to be a communist decides to pull his trigger finger that our president is dead.

In the 1960 election I wasn’t for Kennedy.  My parents were for Nixon and since I lived in a republican town most of my friends were for Nixon, and I was too.  One man made a record called First Family.  The record was goofy and hilarious. I enjoyed it tremendously.  Right now I don’t know that I will ever play it again. One thing I didn’t realize was that in the 3 years Kennedy had been president was how much I had come to respect him.

I went to bed Saturday night dead tired and went right to sleep.  Not having any idea of course what the next two days would bring.

Sunday morning I got up not wanting to turn on the TV.  I knew what would be on and I just couldn’t bear to hear it.  I could never explain how depressed this assassination depressed me.  I felt like something had died in me.  My heart felt broken and I just couldn’t bring myself to believe it was true.  I have never lived through anything so horrible in my entire life.

I don’t know what time it was when we turned on TV,  but when we did finally turn it on they were talking about another shooting.  Then the announcer said that the accused assassin of President Kennedy was shot.  They didn’t yet have the name of the man that did it.  The police were holding and questioning the man that shot Oswald.   A little while later the announcer said they have the name of the man that shot Oswald.  The man’s name is Jack Rubinstein.  He goes by Ruby and owns a night club and runs another on in Dallas, Texas.

For the next two hours we didn’t hear anything about the Oswald shooting because they were taking President Kennedy’s body from the White House to the Capital Building.  The president’s body is to lie in state in the rotunda of the Capital Building.

They took the late president’s body from the White House for the last time and put it on a caisson.   Behind the caisson rode Mrs. Kennedy and the president’s two brothers in a black limousine.  A few blocks before they reached the capital building, Mrs. Kennedy, Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Senator Edward Kennedy walked behind the caisson to the Capital building.  Inside the Capital Building Mrs. Kenned and the Kennedy Family stood there along with other people while some men gave speeches.  Mrs. Kennedy stood there with John Jr. on one side and Caroline on the other side.  I praise her very much for keeping her children with her and no one else.  John got restless and they had to take him out, but what three year old wouldn’t get restless.  Caroline stood there like a little angel.  When all these men finished talking, Mrs. Kennedy and the children walked out and family followed.  They say people were lined up for five miles to view the president’s body.

Sunday night I talked to my friends Ginny and Carla on the phone, and I finally did my homework, part of it anyway.  I was in no mood for recopying “The Murder of Mrs. Jones”.  I was wondering if we were going to have school on Monday.  President Johnson declared Monday a National Day of Mourning.  I finally found out no school on Monday.  Everything was closing on Monday.  Since Friday, there have been no entertaining programs on TV and no advertisements all in respect for President Kennedy.  I don’t think I mentioned that Oswald died almost to the minute that President Kennedy died on Friday.

Monday was finally here and I got up and watched the funeral.  First they took the President Kennedy to the White House.  At the White House Mrs. Kennedy, Robert and Edward Kennedy got out of the car and walked behind the caisson to the church.  Behind the Kennedy’s, President Johnson and his family and dignitaries from other countries walked. They were surrounded by Secret Service men.  It looked like the Secret Service wasn’t taking any chances.  Oswald broke through the tightest barrier of Secret Service Men.  When the president is on parade, they check the street sewers and man hole covers for bombs, they check the buildings and the people along the parade route.  They check people who have made threats and lock them up while the President is in town if it is necessary.  If the president is going to dinner, they check the food, waiters, and guests. They memorize a 1000 page book of faces so they can pick people out of a crowd.  If they know the bullets are coming they are to throw themselves in front of the president and take the bullets meant for the president. If they don’t think the pay is worth it or don’t want to give up their life they can go into fifteen other branches of the Secret Service.  If any of these men knew that the bullets were coming, there is no doubt they would have done what was necessary.  Oswald had a high power rifle that released bullet faster than any human could move.

When they got to the church everyone filed in and they brought the casket into the church.  They had low mass.  Nixon the former vice president and Kennedy’s challenger in the 1960 election was there, and also former presidents Eisenhower and Truman.  They left the church and went to Arlington National Cemetery.  The president is getting a hero’s grave.  He got a Purple Heart during World War II for his performance when his P.T. boat was bombed.  When he was a senator he was hospitalized for an old back injury he received while playing football at Harvard.  While he was in the hospital, he wrote a book Profiles in Courage for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1957.  When they got to Arlington National Cemetery, Cardinal Cushing went through some religious things I don’t understand.  Speeches were made and the band struck up the National Anthem.  Jets flew over, one for each state, and then the presidential plane flew over alone.  Cardinal Cushing said a prayer and then there was a 21 gun salute.  The flag that was over the coffin for the past four days was folded and presented to Mrs. Kennedy.  Mrs. Kennedy stepped forward and lit the eternal flame.  She left and the family followed.  Each person then stepped up to the grave and paid their respects to the late President Kennedy.

Well, it was all over now.  Mrs. Kennedy went through it with great dignity.  She realized that being the wife of a President all eyes were on her.  She knew it would go down in history books.  She did her duties with dignity and gave everyone the spirit they needed.

I know I will never forget this as long as I live.  This tragedy will bring tears to my eyes and emptiness in my heart for a long time.  I will always respect and remember President John Fitzgerald Kennedy 35th President of the United States, 1917-1963, assassinated November 22, 1963.

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst

Bowers Family 1757-1955 (part 2)

Church in EnglandSt. Clements Church and Graveyard

Bonnet Bowers was born in West Acre, Norfolk, England about October 12, 1795.[1]  On April 27, 1822 he married Eliza Linford in Terrington-St Clements Norfolk, England.[2]  Eliza was a widow according to their marriage record, and had a son William Linford[3] from her previous marriage.  You can read about William in my blog post Finding Brother William dated 11/24/2012.  Bonnet and Eliza had four children Richard born 1822[4], Robert born 1825[5], Eliza born in 1827[6] and Charles born in 1828.[7] All the children were born in Terrington-St Clements, Norfolk, England.[8]  The daughter, Eliza, died when she was less than 3 days old and was buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England[9] along with her mother Eliza, who was also buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England on January 22, 1831.[10]

The population of Terrington-St Clements in 1801 was 824.[11]   “In AD 970 Godric gifted part of the lands of Turrintonea to the monks of Ramsey Abbey. The name Terrington comes from the early Saxon “Tun” meaning enclosure or homestead of Tir(a)s people. The settlement is referred to in the Domesday Book as Tilinghetuna.  By the medieval period the small settlement which began on raised ground on the edge of the marsh had grown substantially. The magnificent Parish Church, dedicated to St Clement (i.e. Pope Clement I), known as the “Cathedral of the Marshland”, was built in the 14th century by Edmund Gonville, Rector of Terrington, who founded Gonville Hall (now Gonville and Caius College) at Cambridge University.”[12]

“During the 1840’s Social problems dominated the economic and scene.  The first part of the decade was referred to as the “hungry forties”.  Food prices were high.  A depression threw people out of work.  By 1842 fifteen percent of the population received public assistance and many more received assistance from charities.  In the late 1840’s a new prosperity arose because of the technological revolution and the coming of the railways.”[13]

By 1841 Bonnet Bowers is found living in Stockport, MacClesfield, Cheshire, England along with sons Richard, Robert, and Charles.[14]   Bonnet Bowers was an agricultural laborer.[15]  This means that he was one of the poor working class and earned just enough money to stay alive.  Because manual labor was so physically demanding, men were paid the most during their 20’s when they were in peak physical condition.  After that their pay would go down as they got older.[16]

Women worked as domestic servants, did needlework, midwife, cooking, and many, many more jobs.  Some women even worked in the coal mines until 1842 when the practice of using women underground to haul sledge and coal ended, however women continued to work above ground sorting and loading coal.  Other physical jobs women held during this time were brick making, chain making, and collecting trash from city streets. [17]

The children started working very young and had little schooling.  Some children started working as early as three or four year of age.  In general most children were working by the time they were nine years old.[18]  With the children working the family might be able to accumulate a little savings which they would need once the children married and set up their households.  By the time the children married, the poor food and hard labor weakened the parent’s health.  If they lived to be very old they might end their days in a workhouse unless their children earned enough to take care of them.[19]

The countryside, laborers’ cottage was one or two rooms and the floor was dirt (packed tight) or paving stones.  The cottage was furnished with a table, chairs, cupboard, a shelf, and one or two beds.  Food was cooked over an open fire in a large fireplace.  All eating, sleeping and living were done in a single room.  Sometimes a curtain was pulled for privacy.  The tables sometimes were not big enough for the whole family to sit around.  It was not uncommon for children to be sent elsewhere to sleep, perhaps with an older couple, whose family was grown so teenagers of opposite sex would not have to share beds.[20]

Since Bonnet Bowers and his family were very likely poor, his children might not have had much time to play because they were working. If they had time to play as children, they played with whatever was available at little or no expense.  Games were outdoor running and chasing, and hide and seek.  Purchased toys such as tops and rubber balls were special treats brought home from a fair or put into a Christmas stocking.[21]

Bonnet came to the United States in 1851 with his son Charles.[22]  He lived in Onondaga, Onondaga, New York with his son Robert.[23]  Bonnet died on February 9, 1871 in the town of Onondaga, New York.[24]

 

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst
_________________________________

[1] Baptism for Bonnet Tomas Bowers baptized 12 October 1795; Church of England.  Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah 2001.

[2]  Marriage Record for Bonnet Bowers and Eliza Linford married 27 April 1822; Register of Marriages in the Parish of Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England; 1813-1838 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3] Baptism for William Linford, 28 August 1811; Terrington-St. Slement, Norfolk England: Parish Register Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812 Item 2; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambs., filmed 26 July 1988, Film Number 13640109, film unit # 2161 NCD 2 Roll # 5.

[4] Baptism Record for Richard Bowers baptized 20 April 1822; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[5] Baptism Record for Robert Bowers baptized 25 February 1825; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[6] Baptism Record for Eliza Bowers baptized 10 June 1827; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[7] Baptism for Charles Bowers baptized on 2 October 1828; Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; 1813 – 1841 manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 3; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[8] See footnotes 4 – 7.

[9] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (daughter of Bonnet & Eliza Bowers) buried on 21 June 1827. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[10] Burial record for Eliza Bowers (wife of Bonnet Bowers) buried on 22 January 1831. Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[11] http://visionofbritain.org.uk Vision of Britain website.

[13] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 5.

[14] Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841.Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841.  Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. Class: HO107; Piece 109; Book: 8; Civil Parish: Stockport; County: Cheshire; Enumeration District: 8; Folio: 19; Page: 33; Line: 4; GSU roll: 241242.

[15] Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841.Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841.  Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. Class: HO107; Piece 109; Book: 8; Civil Parish: Stockport; County: Cheshire; Enumeration District: 8; Folio: 19; Page: 33; Line: 4; GSU roll: 241242.

[16]  Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 18 – 20.

[17] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 47-48.

[18] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 43 – 44.

[19] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 20.

[20] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 114.

[21] Sally Mitchell, Dailey Life in Victorian England (Westport Connecticut:  Greenwood Press, 1996), p. 229.

[22] Year: 1851; Arrival: New York, United States; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm roll M237_107; Line: 26; List number: 1664. Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[23] Year: 1860; Census Place: Onondaga, Onondaga, New York; Roll: M653_829; Page: 579; Image: 370; Family History Library Film: 803829.

[24] Syracuse Standard (Syracuse, Onondaga Co., New York) Death Notice for a Burnett (sp) Bowers.

 

Bowers Family 1757 – 1955 (Part 1)

I’ve written a family history on the Bowers Family (my grandmother’s paternal side) covering almost 200 years from 1757 – 1947.  I am posting it on my blog in installments.  Here is the first installment starting with my Great-Great-Great-Great Grandfather and Grandmother.

The Bowers’ Family History starts out in Westacre, Norfolk, England with Charles Bowers born about 1757[1] and Sarah Bonnet born about 1757[2] and the birth of their first child, Charles in 1781.[3]  The first son Charles may have died as a young child because Charles and Sarah have another child born in 1784 named Charles[4] followed by John in 1786,[5] William in 1788,[6] Richard in 1790,[7] twins Mary and Sarah in 1792,[8] Mary in 1793,[9] Bonnet Thomas in 1795,[10] another Sarah in 1797,[11] Robert in 1801,[12] and Thomas in 1802.[13]  The Twin daughters Mary and Sarah died when they were about two months old.[14] [15] Their son Robert died in 1804,[16] daughter Sarah died in 1805,[17] and son Thomas in 1819[18]. In total they had 12 children and four (possibly five) died at a young age.  The two Charles’, John, William, Richard, Mary, Sarah, Mary, Bonnet, and Sarah were born in Westacre, Norfolk, England.[19] Robert and Thomas were born in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England.[20] The twins Mary and Sarah are buried in Westacre, Norfolk England.[21] Robert, Sarah, and Thomas are buried in Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England.[22]  Sarah Bonnet Bowers died at age 69 and was buried on February 1, 1826 in Terrington-St. Clements.[23]  Charles lived to the ripe old age of 81 and was buried January 16, 1839 in Terrington-St. Clements.[24]

 

Copyright © 2013 Gail Grunst


[1] Burial record for Charles Bowers buried on January 16, 1838 age 81; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington-St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Register of Burials in the Parish of Terrington-St. Clements in the County of Norfolk (England); Burials Volume 3, 1813 – 1856; Manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Page 113; microfilmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[2] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (Wife of Charles Bowers) buried on February 1, 1826 age 69; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington-St. Cements, Norfolk, England. Register of Burials in the Parish of Terrington-St. Clements in the County of Norfolk (England) Burials Volume 3, 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Page 54; Microfilmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[3] Baptism record for Charles Bowers baptized 26 October 1781; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 8, Page 256; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[4] Baptism record for Charles Bowers baptized 07 January 1784; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 887920; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[5] Baptism record for John Bowers baptized 22 January 1786; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[6] Baptism record for William Bowers Baptized 03 August 1788; Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Item 9 Page 272; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[7] Baptism record for Richard Bowers baptized 26 October 1790; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City Utah, 2001.

[8] Baptism record for Mary and Sarah Bowers baptized 13 January 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704 Item 9 Page 274; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[9] Baptism for Mary Bowers baptized 23 September 1793; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 887920; Salt Lake City, Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[10] Baptism for Bonnet Thomas Bowers baptized 12 October 1795; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm 2262704 Item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[11] Baptism for Sarah Bowers baptized 30 December 1797; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 276; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[12] Baptism for Robert Bowers Baptized 22 March 1801; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers 1598 – 1964; manuscript on microfilm # 1546346 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[13] Baptism for Thomas Bowers Baptized 24 January 1802; Church of England. Parish Church Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers Baptism and Burials 1772 – 1812; manuscript on microfilm # 13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[14] Burial record for Mary Bowers (born 13 January 1792); Died on 11 March 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 283; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001

[15] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born 13 January 1792); Died on March 6, 1792; Church of England. Parish Church of Westacre, Norfolk, England; Parish Registers for Westacre 1665 – 1903; manuscript on microfilm #2262704 Item 9 Page 283; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2001.

[16] Burial record for Robert Bowers died on 04 July 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[17] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 30 December 1797) died in 1804; Church of England.  Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Parish Registers Baptisms—Burials 1772-1812;  manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 2; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England.

[18] Burial record for Thomas Bowers (born 24 January 1802) buried 16 April 1819; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[19] See footnotes 3 – 15.

[20] See footnotes 11 & 13.

[21] See footnotes 15 & 16.

[22] See footnotes 17, 18, 19.

[23] Burial record for Sarah Bowers (born abt. 1757) buried 8 February 1826; ; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England;  Terrrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah:  filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambridgeshire, England.

[24] Burial Record for Charles Bowers (born abt 1757)buried 16 January 1838; Church of England, Parish Church of Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk, England; Terrington St. Clements Parish Register Burials 1813 – 1856; manuscript on microfilm #13640109 Item 8; Utah: filmed by the Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah 1988 at Wisbech and Fenland Museum, Cambrigeshire, England

 

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